What's Your Favorite Room on the Titanic?


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Lawrence P. Cappe

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I always thought the gymnasium was the most popular room amongst the passengers on board.

My personal favourite is the captain`s bedroom, of course.
Larry
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Now that this thread has been rvived again, I realised that it exists. My fave room would have to be the aft staircase A deck and the B deck restaurant reception room.

Daniel.
 
Jul 11, 2001
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1st class cabin E-82. Why? It is the lowest, most remote first class accomodation, thus probably the most affordable! Plus, it is right next to the gents lavatory. Which is handy in the middle of the night when nature calls. I almost picked a cabin across the hall, but figured a waterview cabin would be more expensive. Then again, maybe I would get to hear the iceberg scrape by! When you look at how the price varies, the lower deck cabins are a bargain seeing that you get all first class privilages of the public rooms. Then you could hobnob with the Millionares on a budget. Did they rent tuxes then? Randy (our fashion consultant) must know that!
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But if money were no object, then I'd kick Ismay out of that Port side Parlour suite! LOL.

Oh! The down side of rooming in E-82 would be if you were a heavy sleeper. I would think the rising water would trap you so far from the forward grand staircase if you woke as the water was tickling your feet!

Dave
 
Jul 9, 2002
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While I am very fond of the look of the Turkish Bath, I would have to agree with those of you that say the 1st Class Smoking Room. A nice place to get away for some idle chit-chat with the other Gentlemen on board, sip some Brandy and enjoy a good cigar. Now that is of course presuming that I could afford a First Class ticket. If not, and I was enjoying the cruise from the Third Class, I would bet that my favorite room on board would have been the Third Class Dinning Saloon. I guess if you cant get all the good views, you may as well eat good food! Cheers!
Ryan
 
Jan 31, 2001
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My favorite room used to be the first class smoking room. Now I prefer the first class reception room on D Deck because it was a large area and looked very inviting. There's just something about it that really catches my eye.

I also have a thing for first class cabins...period. The parlor suites, the Boat Deck cabins, the private promenade decks; I love 'em all. I just love the way they look and the way they were decorated in different styles.
 
Feb 18, 2003
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Brandon
I agree with you the first class rooms were so great and highly decorated. They were great and not to mention that is where the rich stiffs stayed.
 
Jul 11, 2001
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Hi Brandon! If you want, I can scan a few pics of the more spectacular staterooms and email them for you. Everytime I try to post them here, they dont load right. I haven't figured out the right size formula yet! LOL.

Dave
 
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Anna Reznik

Guest
I would have liked to see the tennis courts. I don't even know the surface.

From the rooms I've seen, I like the 1st class smoking room and the Turkish Bath. The glass(or looks like glass) decor seems great in the smoking room and the bath has this weird vibe that draws me in.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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There were no tennis courts, Anna, but the Titanic did have a squash court and that was a very impressive feature in those days.
 
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Anna Reznik

Guest
I know the squash court was after going down D-deck?(or was it b-deck...like it matters) But from some of the books I've seen (it's been years) had both. The tennis was by the swimming pool if it was indeed there.

Wasn't it $1 to get in and only certain people at certain times (like women at 2 or something like that).

Anyway, does anyone know the name of the other tennis player on board. I remembered Williams in 1st class. There was an article in Tennis magazine years ago that mentioned two Titanic survivors meeting in a Wimbledon final years later.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Anna, you can check the deck plans here onsite but trust me, you won't find a tennis court - even the mighty Titanic had its limits! The only public facility near the swimming bath was the Turkish bath, and yes, there was a $1 admission charge and men and women were allocated different time slots.

The other tennis player onboard was Karl Behr, also travelling First Class.
 
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Anna Reznik

Guest
Thanks about the other tennis player.

Maybe the deck plans in that book (I can't even remember which book since I read several at that time so they all blur together) mistaken the squash and tennis courts as the same thing. But they still called could have called it the tennis courts...even if it was officially called the squash courts. It would be too small to play a full court game but bring a net and you could call it the tennis courts. Oh well, I would have made it a tennis court if I were on the Titanic.

Does anyone else think it's creepy to have a swimming pool on a ship?
 
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Anna Reznik

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Real Tennis(the old name of court) is but usually on grass. I think a wall is involved but don't quote me... Rather than just hitting against a wall as one would do if they could find a partner.
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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I'd have to look up court tennis, or real (royal) tennis, as it's also called. As I recall, it's played on a rather long and narrow court and involves bouncing a ball off one wall. The game is still played and I'll bet it's on the Internet.

There certainly was no ordinary tennis court on Titanic, though it sometimes is mentioned in exaggerated accounts of her wonders.

The matter is a bit confused by the fact that squash was not a fully developed game at the time. The game evolved from a game called racquets, which was played with a hard ball and generally on a larger court than is used for modern squash. Accounts from 1912 refer to the man on Titanic as a racquets player. Squash was played with a softer ball (hence the 'squash'). The court on Titanic was 30' x 20', which is close to the 32' x 21' that was being introduced in Britain. That suggests that the game played on board was really squash, rather as we know it.

I have photos of Charles Williams in action. He wears long trousers and a log-sleeved jacket, like a club blazer. His American opponent look more business like. He wears a short-sleeved shirt and long trousers. Their racquets seem ot be about as long as modern tennis racquet, but with a smaller head.
 
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Anna Reznik

Guest
And the rackets of the time were like playing w/ lead. I bet it's still played but I've always played the tennis that is known. I would hate playing during the time but tennis (even if I would have just hit against the wall) but even if the room was not ideal (like stuffy or small) I know I would be playing there until it started to flood.

That is if they don't kick me out. LOL

Wouldn't it be funny if Williams and Behr played something in that room to later play on a bigger stage.
 

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