What's Your Favorite Room on the Titanic?


Jun 11, 2000
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Now listen, Buster ... sorry, decorum
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Comedians always take ages to catch up with reality. I'm not saying the UK is the gastronomic capital of the world, but times certainly have changed, and you can eat very very well here - and any sort of cuisine you like, really. I doubt if there was mutton in 1st class.
"We'll both have the lamb, with very little mint sauce. You like lamb, don't you, Sweetpea?"

The lavish decor of the Turkish bath can be seen in the very recent "Last Mysteries of the Titanic" (I think that's the title) live broadcast from the wreck by J. Cameron et al.
 
Aug 15, 2005
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What's wrong with fish and chips, black pudding and (in Scotland) battered Mars Bars?
As I have said to many French people (who eat escargot's for Christ's sake!), "So what if our food may not be up to your standards - WE got the Olympics!!"
A little off topic...
But, yes, the Turkish baths and the pool were exclusively for the use of first class passengers, or so I believe.
Was a fantastic room, that Turkish bath wasn't it?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Those requiring a real taste of English life should visit my house. All rooms modelled entirely on 3rd class - small, cold, damp, furnished on the cheap and often full of people you wouldn't want to meet on a dark night. Nothing warm except the crates of Bass Export and the glowing tips of Woodbines. Real English cuisine served daily, including bubble & squeak and liver & lights. Very authentic. Competitive rates available for staterooms (and believe me, they really are in a state). No coach parties.
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Adam Lang

Guest
Mmm great food on the Titanic. Although I don't mind a good burger and fries every now and then.

-Adam Lang
 

George Heiss

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Aug 1, 2005
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I guess we can expect to see alot more bizarre posts from this 'Clarissa' troll, huh.

Next thing she will say is that Officer Lowe was taking a ride on the Starboard propeller and that caused the ship to turn slowly and failed to clear the iceberg in time. Is it any wonder what he was doing by the stern of the ship when everyone else was up front.

Hey Jeff...can't wait until Clarissa 'floats' by Parks
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Sorry guys, I know you went back to room topics, but I just caught this one this afternoon and HAD to say something.
 

Ernie Luck

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Nov 24, 2004
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Hi George

I don't think you will hear any more from Clarissa. The Moderators will probably just remove her posts if she comes up with any more nonsence. Sounds painful dos'nt it?
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
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Jul 4, 2000
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Hello, all---

As Fiona said yesterday, the "Clarissa" episode is now over. Further discussion of her is off-topic.

Let's move on, shall we?
 
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Adam Lang

Guest
Actually George, that does sound like a good theory...okay I'm kidding. I think we've all had enough of those "exotic" posts.

And way back to Steven's post, yes the staircase did fall apart during the making of JC's movie when they were sinking their set. This may actually be what really happened on the Titanic. The evidence does add up: Lots of water pressure under the staircase, and a very low amount of staircase wreckage down at the bottom on E Deck. What does everyone think?

-Adam Lang
 
Aug 15, 2005
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I think that the staircase for the film was botched.
Personally, I think that (in reality) those good ol' Irish hands built not only a superb feature, but a strong piece of the ship's anatomical makeup.
For the set of a film, it is expected that the scenery should be taken apart at some point.
Titanic, however, was built to last twenty years... see what I'm getting at?
The actual staircase simply rotted - just like the rest of the woodwork.
Regards, Ryan.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I think that the staircase for the film was botched.<<

Botched how? You said it yourself, it was a movie set. It wasn't designed to last over the long haul and structurally, it wasn't even the same as it would have been in a real ship.

>>The actual staircase simply rotted - just like the rest of the woodwork.<<

To a point there may be some truth to that but only as it applies to whatever portions of the Grand Staircase remained in the wreck. The problem is that few traces have been found, even of the iron bulestrades which surely would have survived. It helps to know that there's a surprising amount of woodwork which survives in the wreck, but no traces of wood or ironwork in the staircase itself beyond a few fragments.
 
Aug 15, 2005
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It was a movie set... That is what I meant when I said botched.
I'm sure that the ballustrades will be down in the wreckage somewhere, and they'd better be recovered, otherwise, my Entrance Hall won't work out to the precision in which I would like it built (the smaller bench-ends have survived, afterall).
Regards, Ryan.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>It was a movie set... That is what I meant when I said botched.<<

That doesn't mean it was botched. The movie set was built to look good on film and that exactly what it did.

With the photos that exist of the staircase on the Olympic, (Titanic's were identical) I don't think your entrance hall model depends on the recovery of the bulestrades to be accurate. To be very clear, there is no evidence whatever of the bulestrades within the wreck itself and this area has been extensively photographed. That includes the foundation where the bulestrades should have been had they remained within the ship's hull.
 
Jul 11, 2001
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It is a mystery, thats for sure. That is one huge item to come completely up and out through the dome opening. I just don't see all those decks of staircase from E-deck up to the boat deck being able to lift up and out of the ship during the plunge.

If it did, would there have been a wooden structure floating the size of a four or five story building? I know they found staircase wreckage from the aft grand staircase. That breaking up during the split makes sense. But even though the forward staircase may have dislodged during the flooding, I still tend to believe it was still in there on the way down and did get eaten up by those organisms. The gilded metal sections having fallen to the bottom and are now deeply buried under the sediment and other debris.
 
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Adam Lang

Guest
I don't think the staircase necessarily floated out of the staircase. That is not likely because the frame for the dome would still be there after the water started flowing in. (Please correct me if I'm wrong) The staircase may have just tipped over to the foyer or the foot of the staircase somewhere.

About David's post, it does make pretty good sense that that could happen. If there was just some sort of formula or animation that could show what would happen with that much water pressure under a staircase, that would be very nice. Actually, they had quite a long discussion about the topic on Titanic: The Last Mysteries on the Discovery Channel. It's a pretty interesting documentary.

-Adam Lang
 

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