What's Your Favorite Room on the Titanic?


Jul 9, 2000
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I think we may be way over-thinking the problem here with all these "scenerios." The fact that the Grand Staircase is missing shouldn't really be that much of a mystery. Consider the enormous hydrodynamic forces at work in there with water being rapidly introduced to the stair column as the ship plunged. The end result as Parks Stephenson so picturesquely described it: The Worlds Largest Cuisinart Blender.
 
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Adam Lang

Guest
Good point. Now I'll just end with the conclusion of, "it was eaten by crustaceans."

Back to the main topic now...I very much liked the foyer on A-Deck, with the chandelier. Very nice.

-Adam Lang
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Two years ago, when this thread first started, I picked the 1st Class Dining Saloon. It was a nice wide open space, but not so overloaded with chintz and tinsel as to be grotesque. The same couldn't be said of the dining saloons on the ships operated by White Star's rivals.
 

George Heiss

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Aug 1, 2005
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Good point Mike, that is my reasoning for liking the Titanic the most (outside of the history behind the ship). Many of the ships were just overdone with Glitz or to the point where it just didn't seem 'normal'. The Titanic on the other hand looked what an English manor would like on land. I like the Lusitania as well in that it does share some of the characteristics of that Titanic offers, but it is a bit overdone and not as refined.

A favorite among steam ship lovers is the Normandie. But to me, I didn't care for the interiors that much. Not my style. At least that is the case from the inside, but I do like the outside.

Geo
 
May 5, 2005
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Good points all of you, I tend to agree about the Normandie. Beautifully proportioned lines, garish interiors. The bloody menu in that spectacular main dining room would have been enough to intimidate me. The Titanic's interiors were beautiful, tasteful, and not overdone. I don't think that photographs do justice to any of these ships however, they just don't capture all the detail, color, and proportions that must have been there. PS are there any decent "virtual tours" of these ships to be had??
 

Jason D. Tiller

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The Titanic movie website never had a virtual tour. For a really excellent 360 virtual tour of the interiors, you can do no better than James Cameron's Titanic Explorer on CD-ROM.

See the various threads in 'Titanic on Computer and the Web' for more info.
 
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Adam Lang

Guest
Hello again,

Jason, I hear JC's Titanic Explorer is a very good resource, although I don't know much about it. Are you able to roam freely about the ship or are they just virtual tours of certain areas? Thanks.

About the interior of a dining room, I also think simple is a good way to go, but I've always adored the Britannia Dining Room on the QM2. Does anyone think that is overdone at all?

-Adam Lang
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Hi Adam,

The virtual tours are of selected areas. Areas included are The Grand Staircase, The First Class Reception and The First Class Dining Saloon, just to name a few. Please see the threads that I referred to above for more info.

As far as the Britannia Dining Room on Queen Mary 2 goes, I don't think it's overdone at all, it's very beautiful and it leaves you in awe when you first walk in (yes, I've been aboard her), but that's my humble opinion. If you wish to discuss it further though, please do so in the Queen Mary 2 folder.

Now back to Titanic's interiors.
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Adam Lang

Guest
Thank you very much, Jason, it's a great help.

I think the Titanic's dining room was very quaint, humbly decorated dining room. You're right, most lines are a bit obsessive with it.

-Adam Lang
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>You're right, most lines are a bit obsessive with it.<<

They frequently paid a price for that obsession too. Most 1st Class Dining Saloons were located in the superstructure along with some of the very best (Read that to mean overdecorated) 1st Class accomodation. All that marble, granite, wrought iron and wall panaling and furniture made with heavy woods so high up only served to raise the ship's centre of gravity as well. That's why a lot of transatlantic liners of that period were had stability problems that made for an unpleasant ride in even mild seas.
 

Jason D. Tiller

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You're very welcome, Adam. Glad to help.

Most of the lines are obsessed with it, because they want the passengers to be awe struck and just for general appeal so that they will return again and again, which in turn provides the shipping line with a huge profit. Of course, this goes back to Titanic's day when White Star chose luxury over speed.

Addendum: Just saw Mike's post, he makes a very good point.

Cheers,

Jason
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Adam Lang

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Actually that thought never really came to my mind until now, Mike. You do make a very good point. They often had to make the hard decision between using heavy, valuable materials, or a smooth-riding ship. At least now, cruise lines can pick both.

-Adam Lang
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>At least now, cruise lines can pick both.<<

It helps to know that cruise ships tend to do their work in balmier climates and also make a point of getting the hell out of the way when dangerous weather threatens. Trans-Atlantic liners never had that luxury. They had specfic routes (Lines) that they had to run between say Southampton or Liverpool to New York and had to tough it out regardless of conditions. I assure you on the North Atlantic, those conditions can be downright savage.

Topweight was always a problem with these ships, and with vessels designed to break speed records (Requiring a long and slender hull along with lots of power) this could make for some very rides that were as uncomfortable as they were frightening. The Olympic class at least avoided this problem by going for what I call restrained good taste.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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I'm rather fond in the Lounge! I love her Versailles style and the room seems so luxurious and comfortable with that velvets! I appreciate the A La Carte restaurant too!

Best, João
 

Lucy Burkhill

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Mar 31, 2006
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>>I'm rather fond in the Lounge! I love her Versailles style and the room seems so luxurious and comfortable with that velvets!<<

Hi, Joao,

Are you aware that the 1st class lounge from the Olympic (which is of course identical to that of the Titanic), is preserved in the White Swan Hotel at Alnwick, Northumberland, North-East England? There are photos of it here on ET- just go into the "Olympic" section, go to "Retirement, Scrapping and Relics", then look in the "Olympic Suite, Alnwick" thread, which has a photo of the room, also one of the postings has a link to another page featuring excellent pics of the room.

If ever you are in the North East of England, be sure to visit the White Swan Hotel to see for yourself this fabulous room. It is certainly a moving experience to caress the exquisite panelling and imagine one's self as a 1st class passenger on the Titanic, or even a member of the H&W workforce viewing the completed ship before she left Belfast. The best time to visit is during the week, as I did, when there is less chance of the suite being used for a private function.
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Regards,

Lucy
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

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Thanks, Lucy, I'm looking forward to go to England!Yes, I knew about the existance of that panelling in the hotel you referred.
 

Darin Kight

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May 29, 2010
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I would like to pick-up this thread, as I'm new here and I felt the need to express myself on this subject. My favorite rooms on the Titanic are the smoking-room and library from 2nd class. And just because they bear the distiction of being 2nd class, as far as White Star went and middle-class aspirations went, I feel these two rooms were more cozy, more intimate, Where the decor was not so...grand. These were still formal places, as most second class passengers had aspirations of obtaining a first class lifestyle. The rooms just looked simpler, more welcoming, to me. They are both handsome rooms. Remember that second class on Titanic was equal to and in some cases exceeded first class on other liners.
 

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