When did the Double Bottom Fully Detach?


Kyle Naber

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Is it possible that the stern fully broke away at the time of the breakup, and it simply sank due to the weight of the engines and the incoming water? Or is it more likely that the double bottom flexed and dragged the stern under with the bow?

Many survivors remembered thinking that the stern was going to float on its own for a moment. To me, this would only be possible if it remained in a horizontal configuration for at least two minutes, meaning that the double bottom was either holding the bow in a vertical position under the water, or the ship has actually fully broken apart with the stern on the surface.

What are your thoughts?
 
May 3, 2005
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Is it possible that the stern fully broke away at the time of the breakup, and it simply sank due to the weight of the engines and the incoming water? Or is it more likely that the double bottom flexed and dragged the stern under with the bow?

Many survivors remembered thinking that the stern was going to float on its own for a moment. To me, this would only be possible if it remained in a horizontal configuration for at least two minutes, meaning that the double bottom was either holding the bow in a vertical position under the water, or the ship has actually fully broken apart with the stern on the surface.

What are your thoughts?
I am neutral on the subject.
But I am afraid you might get as many different thoughts as there are many different members of these forums. ???
 

Seungho Kang

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Mar 5, 2019
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South Korea
Is it possible that the stern fully broke away at the time of the breakup, and it simply sank due to the weight of the engines and the incoming water? Or is it more likely that the double bottom flexed and dragged the stern under with the bow?

Many survivors remembered thinking that the stern was going to float on its own for a moment. To me, this would only be possible if it remained in a horizontal configuration for at least two minutes, meaning that the double bottom was either holding the bow in a vertical position under the water, or the ship has actually fully broken apart with the stern on the surface.

What are your thoughts?
Based off of Roy Mengot's theory, I think that the keel sections would fail and buckle upwards, it would either:
1: break separately and fall out when the bottom opens up or
2: stay connected on the stern section and after the forward tower section goes down, the stern would rotate and sink(or sink with a port list), and that would be when the keel separates from the stern and flap.
 

Kyle Naber

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You could ask that question under any thread on this entire site...
 
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