When did the Marconi wires slung between Titanics Masts Snap?


MMacleod

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Jan 2, 2021
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Hello, I was wondering at what stage during the Titanics sinking did the four Marconi lines running between the ships masts snap? They obviously must have been broken after the hull snapped in half but could Funnels 1 and 2 rolling off or the bow mast getting fully submerged have severed them earlier? I know the Britannic lost her set when the mIne hit so I could also see the general stresses throughout the Titanic's hull breaking them not long after the last transmissions went out.
 
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Cam Houseman

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Jul 14, 2020
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Hello, I was wondering at what stage during the Titanics sinking did the four Marconi lines running between the ships masts snap? They obviously must have been broken after the hull snapped in half but could Funnels 1 and 2 rolling off or the bow mast getting fully submerged have severed them earlier? I know the Britannic lost her set when the mIne hit so I could also see the general stresses throughout the Titanic's hull breaking them not long after the last transmissions went out.
Hi! Hope you're well
that's a good question! Have any wires been found by the bow, besides the cables on the portside forecastle?
Maybe the wires were ripped away during the Bow's descent, already loose from the breakup!
 

Mike Bull2019

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Oct 8, 2019
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I have wondered if, IF, as the ship separated and IF the stern rolled to port, the Marconi lines held on long enough to give an initial pull on the foremast towards the port side as we see it today? I'm not convinced though that the attachment points of the aerial would be strong enough to allow this, but clearly they would have been pulled taut as the ship split.

(For clarity- I don't mean the fact that the mast is fallen back- that had to be hydrodynamics- I mean, the fact it is over to port)
 
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Cam Houseman

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Jul 14, 2020
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Maryland, USA
I have wondered if, IF, as the ship separated and IF the stern rolled to port, the Marconi lines held on long enough to give an initial pull on the foremast towards the port side as we see it today? I'm not convinced though that the attachment points of the aerial would be strong enough to allow this, but clearly they would have been pulled taut as the ship split.

(For clarity- I don't mean the fact that the mast is fallen back- that had to be hydrodynamics- I mean, the fact it is over to port)
how strong were the wires Mike?
 

Mike Bull2019

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Oct 8, 2019
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Possibly strong enough, though it would be the attachments to the mast itself that would be the weak link in the idea. The four forward bridle wires were (from memory!) about 2 1/2 inches in diameter and joined together and then to the mast at a common point, though at the aft mast it was all strung up through a block and a wire that continued down to the deck; in other words, you could lower the entire aerial like a giant washing line.

I suspect nothing was strong enough to hold on and give enough of a directional pull on the foremast, but there's no doubting that the aerial would have been pulled tight until it failed by the ship splitting, so it's interesting to ponder.
 
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