White Star's Company Address

  • Thread starter Daniel Odysseus
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Daniel Odysseus

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On the web, I found the address:
10 Water St., Liverpool
as the White Star Line's address at the time of Titanic. Can anyone confirm this for me?

Thanks!
-D.O.
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
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Dec 29, 2000
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Hello, Daniel---

10 Water Street was White Star's registered office from the time Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. was formed on 6 September 1869 until 31 December 1897, when the line's headquarters building at 30 James Street was opened. That address then served as the line's headquarters until 1 July 1929, when the main office was moved to Royal Mail House, Leadenhall Street, London. Still later, after White Star was separated from the Royal Mail Group, the registered office was moved again, to Oceanic House on Cockspur Street, London, which was once the West End office of all of the IMM lines.

The James Street office remained White Star's main Liverpool address until after the merger with Cunard. It was closed 1 September 1934, when about 200 White Star employees joined 500 Cunard staff at the Cunard Building and 300 other employees of both lines were dismissed.

I don't know whether White Star continued to maintain an office at the Water Street address after 1897.

Sources: The Times (London), 1 July 1929; Anderson's White Star; Mallett and Bell's The Pirrie-Kylsant Motorships.
 
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Daniel Odysseus

Guest
Thanks!

The James Street address is where the White Star main headquarters was, right? Where Ismay worked?

Thanks!
-D.O.
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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THE PACIFIC BUILDING

There is an excellent color photograph of the White Star Building on David Cotgreave's 'rivet counter' web site. I can't quote the link but a search should swiftly elicit. The architect was Norman Shaw who also designed New Scotland Yard in London in the same style.

The building occupies the corner of James Street and The Strand and has two pepper-pot turrets on the Strand Street gable end. Reputedly, J.Bruce Ismay's office was at the base of the nearer turret as aspected to the camera. The gable end was rebuilt in a less ornate style after bomb damage in World War II.

After being vacated by the White Star Line c.1931 the building became known as the PACIFIC BUILDING and as such was the HQ of the prestigious Pacific Steam Navigation Company Limited. This occupancy was very probably a legacy of the Royal Mail nexus. Other commercial tenants occupied the lower floors.

The building is still very much in use today but for more prosaic purposes than ship management.

Noel
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 27, 2000
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Question before the house - If someone in London, in 1912, wished to purchase a ticket on the Titanic, where would they go? I had always thought the Oceanic House.

Curious in Texas,
Cook
 

John Hemmert

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Oct 16, 2002
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Hi Pat!

Where ya at in Texas? (I live in D/FW) Most often, from what I've seen, ticket selling agencies abounded. The most prominent of which was Thos. Cook & Son. (Still in existence.) Renowned for their worldwide tours, passages, and literature on geography & steamship/rail schedules, they still maintain a huge archive in England. Chatted with one of the archivists once on the phone while doing research. VERY cool people!

Best regards!
John.
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 27, 2000
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Hi John,

We (Rose Ann and I, along with a flock of dogs) live just outside of Houston, near Sugarland (Yes, for those non-Texans, they have this large Sugar company there - anybody ever see Spielberg's early movie, "The Sugarland Express"?).

Thanks for that note about Thos. Cook and sons, John - I confess I didn't think of them, albeit that name should be easy to recall.

Rose Ann and I, while visiting London last April, dined at the Texas Embassy restaurant. Wait, before you think us rank tourists - and I'm sure you know this - the 'Embassy' is located in the old Oceanic building. It was there that I began to wonder whether it was THE ticket office in 1912, later to become White Star headquarters.

Best regards from one Texan to another,
Cook
 

John Hemmert

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Oct 16, 2002
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Hi Pat!

I would imagine that it was one of the places one could acquire tickets.

And yup! I'm quite familiar with Sugarland. A friend of mine still lives there last I heard. (In the 80's & 90's I lived in Houston, Pasadena, & LaPorte)

Best regards!
John.
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 27, 2000
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Hi Mark! I hadn't seen (or saw but forgot) that particular thread. I suppose there's really no way to find out where someone purchased their ticket geographically without some sore of paper trail.

As always, thanks for the help, O M.

Warmest regards,
Cook
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Cook, I recently got my dirty hands on a 1908 map of Liverpool, on which are listed a number of WSL offices. I'll give you the addresses if you are interested - I've called round but there doesn't seem to be anyone working today!
What the hell is going on - both you and that old goat Behe posting messages at what must be 4.00 in the morning over there. Are you in it together?
Have Rose Ann & Pat finally gotten their heads together and decided to throw you both out? Are you living on the streets?

Concerned
Liverpool.
 
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Andrew Williams

Guest
Geoff!

Two opinions come to mind about the plight of Cook and Behe. First, shall we inform the Sally Army headquarters in the U.S.A.?

Or failing that, shall we start a collection to help these two poor souls from wandering the streets?

Yes it is deeply concerning!

Andrew W.
 

Pat Cook

Member
Apr 27, 2000
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Andrew, your concern is heart-warming. However, in Behe's case, he LIKES wandering the streets.

Back to the subject, thanks Geoffy. Actually, just trying to pin down another Beesley-ism and, in this case, having more addresses won't really help. If there had been one address - the Oceanic House - it was a slam-dunk.

Much appreciate the thought, O M

As ever and ever,
Cook
 

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