Who owns the wreck of the Britannic


Jan 5, 2001
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Hi!

My internet access's fleeting this week, so it's just a quick post. Mills is - as I understand -- a director of the UK-based company Governcheck, and has been the wreck's owner since 1996. As I said in November 2000:


(It's a brief explanation and pretty rough, but it should answer your question.)

Best regards,

Mark.
 
May 8, 2001
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Yes, he's the owner. I believe he has a book out, but I am not too certain of the details of his purchase of her...... Oh how I wish I were Simon Mill's friend!
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(It is a dream of mine to see Britannic.)
 
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Brian Hawley

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Colleen here is a photo of Mills at the 2003 BTS convention. I am on the left, having just gotten Simon to sign his book for me. I must say he was a nice fellow and easily approachable.


Brian
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Not that I'm aware of. He's never indicated any interest in doing so in public that I'm aware of, but then I'm hardly a confidant. Not long ago, Simon Mills penned something on the salvage issue which some may find worth their time to read. My read of it would tend to indicate that being the owner of the ship is no bed of roses, but go to - and judge for yourself.

To everyone with an interest in the raising the Britannic:..
 

Jeremy Lee

Member
Jun 12, 2003
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Simon Mills implies in the letter that he is irritated by people thinking that the Britannic can be raised and is flooding him with messages and questions.

Well, if you are happy to own the wreck and let it be (like me), then I don't think you would have such a big headache.

Just tell potential salvagers and people who want the wreck raised to shut up! will do the trick.
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Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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> Just tell potential salvagers and people who want the wreck raised to shut up!

I sure hope not! That's a poor way to keep in good graces with the public by telling people to 'shut up'. The letter Simon penned is courteous, professional, and is a sufficient answer to the flood of inquiries he apparently receives yearly.

Being in the PR business, I also receive inquiries, often the same question over and over, which also warrants a smile and a reply to a question I must pretend I've never heard before. In the event a multitude of the same question/inquiry comes across my desk, I will pen a short article that I hope will please the masses, but not everyone reads it and the inquiries keep coming. Such is life.

But, telling someone to 'shut up' is the last thing I'd consider. That's purely unprofessional...

Another Equal Opportunity Curmudgeon....
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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I meant it as a figure of speech... But I must agree with Simon Mills that 'being an owner of
an Olympic-class liner is not easy', due to the hundreds or even thousands of enquiries that he have, so for those 'repeats', I would probably just have to adopt a closed-door policy. (If I own the Britannic!)

Now thats a more polite way to put it!
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May 8, 2001
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Jeremy. You asked about Mr. Mills selling the Britannic. This is my humble opinion, and I say this from an outsiders view, not knowing the politics involved. He has a huge responsibility, but been crystal clear on his intentions of the ship, what he will and will not allow, and has not budged. I believe the Britannic is quite "safe" in his hands, and I pray he doesn't feel the need to sell her. I cringe to think of the possible schemes that would be hatched over "making money" off Titanic's sister. It would raise opposition and tension, no matter what they wanted to do. (The fate of one of Lusitanias' propellers come to mind.)
On the other hand, I am excited with his thought of someday possibly having a submersible available so novices could go and see her too. A sight I would truly love to see. (The moment I spotted a prototype submersible named "Jules" I thought of Britannic.)
Anyhow, as I stated, it is just my opinion.
 

Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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I don't think RMST could take on anything else right now, considering the woes they're having just with Titanic...

...and if RMST wasn't making money off Titanic, a name synonymous with marketing draw, I wouldn't imagine the 'forgotten sister' would be worth their while.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>AS long as its ethical..... <<

Ethical, I'm afraid, would have nothing to do with it. The question would be whether or not any such sale was legal under any of the applicable laws in the countries that have jurisdiction and whether or not the one offering to buy has the money to do that.

Right now, RMSTI seems to be in quite a bit of financial trouble. I can't see them coming up with the money to by a piece of bubblegum, much less the Britannic.
 
Sep 22, 2003
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i dont see why RMSTI would want to buy britannic, besides the fact the she's titanic's sister ship. besides that britannic, unlike titanic doesn't have a huge debri field filled shoes, wine bottles, jewlry, dolls, silverware, sinks, etc. that they can salvage and display and charge people to view.
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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Aaarrrggghhh!!! I have been misunderstood twice in the past 3 days!!!
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>>a company like RMST<<

I was not suggesting that RMST take over the wreck of the Britannic, I was meaning that it is possible that a public-listed company like RMST can buy the wreck of the Britannic and publicise it (Especially because she is the forgotten sister!)

>>besides that britannic, unlike titanic doesn't have a huge debri field filled shoes, wine bottles, jewlry, dolls, silverware, sinks, etc. that they can salvage and display and charge people to view.<<

Don't forget that as Britannic is so much lower than the Titanic, it is possible to allow people to dive in or near the wreck instead of viewing it from a submersible (Although I don't know if it is permissible).

I agree that there is less to salvage from the Britannic because she was a hospital ship and did not split into 2, therefore there isn't a huge debris field on the seabed. But leaving as it is is good enough, it would be just to publicise the ship.

And what is happening to the scheme on turning Britannic into the world's first underwater museum? HMHSB anyone?
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Brian R Peterson

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Hi Jeremy,

>>Don't forget that as Britannic is so much lower than the Titanic, it is possible to allow people to dive in or near the wreck instead of viewing it from a submersible (Although I don't know if it is permissible).<<

I understand what you are trying to say here, however the Britannic lies at a depth of 300+ feet - only professional divers should ever attempt this depth as the slightest flaw can be fatal.

>>I agree that there is less to salvage from the Britannic because she was a hospital ship and did not split into 2, therefore there isn't a huge debris field on the seabed. But leaving as it is good enough, it would be just to publicize the ship.<<

Mr. Mills probably does not publicize the wreck because the more people are aware of the location of the wreck the greater the possibility of pirates nicking whatever they can from the wreck to sell on the black market as they have done to Titanic. Not only this, but how would you go about publicizing her? Most people don’t know she exists to begin with....

>>And what is happening to the scheme on turning Britannic into the world's first underwater museum? HMHSB anyone?<<

The huge cost of maintenance on the USS Arizona monument is probably the best answer to why the underwater Britannic museum will never see the light of day.

Best Regards,

Brian
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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>>Mr. Mills probably does not publicize the wreck because the more people are aware of the location of the wreck the greater the possibility of pirates nicking whatever they can from the wreck to sell on the black market as they have done to Titanic. Not only this, but how would you go about publicizing her? Most people don’t know she exists to begin with....<<

Pirates looting the Titanic? I didn't know that! Is there any thread here that I can read on this issue?

As for publicity, we could do a TV series or a movie (much better than the original one!) to swot up the interest, together with Britannic memorabilia. If enough items are salvaged, a Britannic exhibition can also be set up, but on a smaller scale that the Titanic one.
 

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