Who smoked Who not


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Hitch

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Feb 4, 2004
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I hope someone can answer this.
Can anyone tell me witch of the following did not smoked.

Benjamin Guggenheim
John Jacob Astor
Sir Cosmo
Colonel Gracie
Bruce Ismay
Thomas Newman

I really need to know this.
Thank in advance.
-Carl
 
C

Cornelius Thiessen

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I'm not sure about the others on your list but I believe Ismay smoked, I've seen pictures of him with a cigar in his mouth.
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Off the top of my head, the following people were smokers of either cigarettes, pipes or cigars:

EJ Smith
Pitman
Edith Russell
Dorothy Gibson
Rene Harris
Edward Ryan

Cheers,

Boz
 

Hitch

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Thanks guys.
Dorothy Gibson? But I thought women did end smoked? They where end aloud in the smokingroom right?
 
Oct 15, 2006
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I'm not sure but I read somewhere that Lady Duff Gordon smoked...

Sorry for my english, I'm from Quebec and my native language is french
 
Feb 9, 2006
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I thought I heard somewhere that women objecting to crew smoking in the lifeboats was because at that point in time smoking was for set times, in smoking rooms, and it was not yet socially acceptable to smoke in times of stress? Plus there's a class difference...

If women smoked, where did they do it?
 

Jim Kalafus

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Well, a lot depended upon to which social class the woman belonged. For instance, a bit earlier than the Titanic, several of Jack the Ripper's victims were pipe smokers, and in the US ca 1910, the "millworker" class of women smoked, as did portions of the group of what was refered to as "The Foreign Element." But, for middle class and upper class women smoking was radical enough to be worthy of newspaper inclusion when it was practiced openly.

>where did they do it?

Unless one was a radical or a suffragette, one did so behind closed doors and not in mixed company.
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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Women definitely smoked at this time, but it was a touchy subject. Edith Wharton's "House of Mirth", written 1902, deals with the issue of ladies smoking. Most lady smokers would have avoided smoking in public. And Helen Schlegel of EM Forster's "Howard's End", published 1910, also smoked.

I believe Thomas Cardeza and his manservant have been tentatively identified as the men who made Elizabeth Shutes anxious with their smoking in the lifeboat.

And I'm fairly certain that a photo of Sir Cosmo Duff Gordon leaving the inquiry shows him lighting a cigarette.

Captain Crosby has been identified - tentatively - as the heavy-set cigar smoker watching Robert Douglas Spedden spin his top in the famous deck photo. And, of course, the unidentified man in the photo with his back to the camera has a cigarette in his hand.

We had an extensive thread on this in, if I'm correct, 2002. It's worth searching for. From what I recall, Miss Roth, Miss Badman, Lady DG, Mahala Douglas, Charlotte Cardeza, Daisy Spedden, Jean Hippach and Beatrice Sandstrom were ultimately smokers. I'm not sure which among them, if any, smoked in 1912.
 

Ben Holme

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Feb 11, 2001
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Captain Crosby has been identified - tentatively - as the heavy-set cigar smoker watching Robert Douglas Spedden spin his top in the famous deck photo.

Indeed, Brian. This is also reinforced by Elmer Taylor's account of sharing a boat train compartment with the Crosbys. He remembered Capt. Crosby fumbling in his waistcoat pocket for his morning cigar, and admitted that he too lit up as a way of breaking the ice and possibly obfuscating the embarrassment of intruding upon the Crosby private carriage!

Other smokers might be identified from body decriptions. Offhand, I recall Walter Douglas and Austin Partner having numerous tobacco products (cigar cutters etc) secreted about their persons.

Cheers,
Ben
 
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