Who was on Collapsibles A/B before the break up?


RmS_TItAnIc

Member
Nov 29, 2020
15
7
3
I am writing something about titanic survivors in the water, can anybody give me names of people who where on collapsibles A/B before titanic broke up, so I can read what they saw, thank you.
 

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
231
375
108
I am writing something about titanic survivors in the water, can anybody give me names of people who where on collapsibles A/B before titanic broke up, so I can read what they saw, thank you.
Below are the numbers given by survivors on collapsible Engelhardt lifeboat A and B and the names of known occupants:

Collapsible Engelhardt lifeboat A:

10 to 12 (Abelseth)

12 to 14 (Brown)

14 (Bright)

About 20 (Rheims)

20 to 30 (Mellors)

21 (Lowe)



14 known occupants according to this list:

Third class passenger Rhoda Mary 'Rosa' Abbott (1873-1946)

Third class passenger Olaus Jørgensen Abelseth (1886-1980)

First class saloon steward Edward Brown (1878-1926)

First class passenger Peter Dennis Daly (1860-1932)

Third class passenger Carl Olof Jansson (1890-1978)

Fireman Charles Edward Judd (1880-1960)

First class saloon steward William Watson Lucas (1881-1944)

Second class passenger William John Mellors (1893-1948)

Third class passenger Oscar Wilhelm Johansson (1879-1967)

First class passenger George Alexander Lucien Rheims (1879-1963)

Fireman John William Thompson (1871-19?)

Barber Augustus Henry Weikman (1860-1924)

Third class passenger August Wennerström (1884-1950)

First class passenger Richard Norris Williams (1891-1968)



Collapsible Engelhardt lifeboat B:

20 (Bentham)

20 to 25 (Joughin)

28 to 30 (Lightoller)

28/30 (Thayer/Gracie)

28 (Sunderland)

31 (Dorkings)

36 (Lucas)

30 to 40 (Bride)

21 known occupants according to this list:

First class passenger Algernon Henry Barkworth (1864-1945)

Junior wireless operator Harold Sydney Bride (1890-1956)

Scullion John Collins (1894-1941)

Third class passenger Eugene Patrick Daly (1883-1965)

Third class steward Sidney Edward Daniels (1893-1983)

Third class passenger Edward Arthur Dorkings (1893-1954)

Engineers mess steward Cecil William Fitzpatrick (1890-1964)

First class passenger Archibald Gracie IV (1859-1912)

Trimmer William Albert Thomas Hebb (1889-1932)

Fireman Walter Hurst (1888-1964)

Chief baker Charles John Joughin (1878-1956)

Second officer Charles Hebert Lightoller (1874-1952)

Fireman William Charles Lindsay (1881-1960)

Entremetier Isaac Hiram Maynard (1880-1948)

Trimmer James McGann (1882-1918)

Trimmer John O’Connor (1882-1933)

Third class passenger Patrick O'Keeffe (1890-1939)

Fireman Harry Senior (1881-1937)

Third class passenger Victor Francis Sunderland (1892-1973)

First class passenger John “Jack” Borland Thayer III (1894-1945)

First class saloon steward Thomas Arthur Whiteley (1894-1944)
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Lars Lunden

Member
May 21, 2016
36
19
58
Norway
Collapsible B - Norwegian passenger Albert Moss was swimming in the water and reached the capsized lifeboat, already filled with people on top. Shut him off! They said to the man closest to Albert.

Albert mentioned in an interview back in the 50's- that he believed the man to be Phillips.

Phillips responded: I cannot!

At the same time Lighholler was spotted swimming towards the boat and got the others attention and Albert Moss got his chance to climb up on the boat.

Albert Moss gave a total of five interviews during his lifetime. His grandson, Dag Bertelsen, has written a book about him.
 
Dec 13, 1998
296
4
263
Oscar Wilhelm Johansson was probably not on collapsible A; he left in a lifeboat together with Oscar Hedman, according to one interview with Mr. Hedman (who gave several, partly contradictory, interviews about his escape)
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
231
375
108
Oscar Wilhelm Johansson was probably not on collapsible A; he left in a lifeboat together with Oscar Hedman, according to one interview with Mr. Hedman (who gave several, partly contradictory, interviews about his escape)
Thank you for the correction and additional information Mr. Engberg-Klarström. May I personally thank you for your outstanding work on the updated and more well researched listing of which survivor was in which lifeboat?
 

Duquesa

Member
Oct 17, 2021
1
0
1
Brazil
I remember reading an account that Edith Corse Evans was standing in a boat, but she was tired and ended up falling to her death, maybe she was in boat B before the break up, or boat A, they say that she fell and tried to climb up but she couldn't
 

Thomas Krom

Member
Nov 22, 2017
231
375
108
I remember reading an account that Edith Corse Evans was standing in a boat, but she was tired and ended up falling to her death, maybe she was in boat B before the break up, or boat A, they say that she fell and tried to climb up but she couldn't
First class passenger George Alexander Lucien Rheims (1879-1963) told fellow first class passenger Edith Louise Rosenbaum (1879-1975) about a woman on Collapsible Engelhardt lifeboat A, who is believed to have been miss Evans. He told her the following story, these are in miss Rosenbaum her own words:

“One man told us he had kissed his brother-in-law good-bye and jumped into the sea, as his brother-in-law could not swim. He swam in the icy water for about an hour before being taken up by a collapsible boat. These collapsible boats had been launched without the corks in the bottom, so they rapidly filled up with water, and his pathetic story of how he and others had to stand up all night, balancing the boat from side to side, as there was water in it and they could not sit down, was heartrending. A young woman stood in front of him - by some thought to be Miss Evans, of Boston, the young woman who so nobly gave up her seat so that Mrs. Brown, the mother of children, could be saved. She stood in the icy water as long as she could. Finally, she said to this man (Mr. Rheims, of Paris), “I cannot stand up any longer. I must sit down.” He said, “We must stand up and sway our bodies so as to keep this boat from sinking. I cannot assist you, but if you sit down you will be drowned.” The poor girl stood it as long as she could; finally, her head dropped closer and closer to the water until she was submerged. Mr. Rheims told me she lay a dead weight on his feet for over an hour. Finally, the wash of the waters carried her out of the boat. The poor young woman had died.”