Why all the interest

  • Thread starter monica gugliotta-ruggeri
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monica gugliotta-ruggeri

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May be the question has a hundred answers, may be even more. It has just always been a mystery to me. I remember people talking about it since I was a little kid and they talked about it as if they were there and it had happened the day before. This site is a living proof of many people of different ages and culture deeply interested in Titanic and everything about her and her only voyage. Sometimes it strikes me pretty hard when I drive myself into thinking that 1500 souls were lost, I mean I feel bad being fascinated with such a tragedy. Sometimes I think that survivors of the wreck would feel mad at me for being interested in details of their worst nightmare. Anyway, probably my quetion is too retorical. I just thought that maybe one of you could have sorted it all out.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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In my opinion...good publicity.

The disaster itself was a huge media event at the time it happened, but as with all such, people seemed to get over it quickly enough. Far worse happened since then that have recieved little attention in the history books despite being far worse.

The thing is, ships like the Morro Castle, Lusitania, and Empress of Iraland didn't have somebody like Walter Lord going for them. His work, A Night To Remember, was made into a movie within a few years and it's been an on-going phenomenon ever since.
 

Paul Visser

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Sep 19, 2007
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I have to agree with Michael H on what he said. The Titanic got huge publicity and both the United States and the united states held an inquiry into the disaster which the press monitored very closely. The British Inquiry spent 36 days taking evidence.

Note that in 1912, this was the worst ever ship wreck at that time and what is more, they had a collection of some of the worlds’ most prominent people on board.
 
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monica gugliotta-ruggeri

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I agree with you and Michael on that, but good publicity was just the beginning. It does explaiin why you and me know about the Titanic but it doesn't explaiin why we are so deeply interested in Titanic along with thousand more. Publicity alone does not create a myth. Recently, here in my country everybody talked about the US-Irak war, it was all over the news, today is old news. Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe there's something more, it is not usual stuff.
 

Paul Visser

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Sep 19, 2007
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Films were made about the Titanic disaster right after she had sunk and the facts were made known through the British and American inquiries.

A good movie is always remembered, especially a real life story. My guess is that the films that were made must have drawn peoples curiosity to what actually happened on the Titanic before and when the Titanic sank. In the end of the day, as far as I am concerned, it has everything to do with media.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>In the end of the day, as far as I am concerned, it has everything to do with media.<<

Which, when you get down to it goes full circle right back to good publicity.

The Titanic got a helluva lot of press back in 1912, but people got over it quickly enough and World War One did a lot to push it onto the back burners. It wasn't long befor the whole event simply followed the usual course of fading from public conciousness.

Disasters at sea just as bad and even worse have come and gone, but outside of our group, who remembers them?

>>Publicity alone does not create a myth. <<

Actually, it's central to doing exactly that. Otherwise, who cares?
 
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monica gugliotta-ruggeri

Guest
>May be you and Michael are right about it. I just hate the idea of being >influenced by the media.Here in my country it doesn't have a good >reputation to put it nicely, you can get from it everything but the truth >with some rare exception. If what you state is true we are in a way part >of it. l[Delete this line and type your message here]
 
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monica gugliotta-ruggeri

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>By the way ,do you happen to know whre I can get a transcript of those >inquiries? Thanks in advance.[Delete this line and type your message here]
 
Dec 2, 2000
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You can read the complete transcripts on line at the Titanic Inquiry Project. The URL is http://www.titanicinquiry.org/

If you wish to purchase printed copies for yourself, I beleive the British Wreck Commission's transcript can be purchased through just about any bookseller. The U.S. Senate transcript can be purchased through the Congressional Information Service at http://www.lexisnexis.com/academic/3cis/cisMnu.asp

Beware that these publications aren't cheap.
 
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monica gugliotta-ruggeri

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>Could you please answer me two questions? I read in the British Inquiry >that all children from first and second class were saved, but in the >biografy of Loraine Alison it's said that she perished in the wreck, so >what's the truth? Second till what age passengers were considered children? Thank you in advance.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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The truth is that Allison Lorraine went down with the ship. Bear in mind that while the inquiries are a valuable first hand resource, they were far from perfect. There was a lot of confusion over the passenger lists for example, so that it wasn't always possible to get the numbers streight.

There were the usual headaches with last minute bookings, cancellations, failures to show, mis-spellings, etc. Even with the list of survivors compiled aboard the Carpathia, errors were made.

The problem in this case was that the final and most accurate passenger list that would have been compiled once the Titanic had left Queenstown never made it off the ship.

As to what age passengers were considered children, that one's been debated, but if memory serves, the age was 13 or thereabouts.
 
Jul 7, 2002
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My friends often ask me what it is about Titanic that I find so fascinating. I think it was Don Lynch who summed it up best (in either the A&E documentary or Beyond Titanic, I can't remember which) when he said "once Titanic touches your life she never lets go."

I read Walter Lord's A Night to Remember in junior high, and I never got over it. When I saw the haunting pictures of the wreck I was captivated.

So I guess what I'm saying, Monica, is that we are all fascinated by some aspect(s) of the tragedy that compel us to keep looking for answers. Of course, those aspect vary from person to person, so there's no definitive answer to your question.

Best wishes,

Cathy
 
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Renae Tadsen

Guest
So many unanswered and unanswerable questions about countless aspects of the disaster.
So few absolute facts (date & time of disaster, number of lifeboats...).
Even after 91 years, it's still full of intriguing mysteries, both human and mechanical, that attract the interest of an incredibly broad range of people.
No definitive answer, indeed.
Renae
 

Paul Visser

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Sep 19, 2007
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I have just found a brilliant explanation to ho the Titanic became such a legend. This is an excerpt from http://search.eb.com/titanic/01_01.html.

"Many of those who perished on the ship came from prominent American, British, and European families. Among the dead were the noted British journalist William Thomas Stead and heirs to the Straus and Astor fortunes. The glamour associated with the ship, its maiden voyage, and its notable passengers magnified the tragedy of its sinking in the popular mind. Legends arose almost immediately around the night's events, those who had died, and those who had survived. Heroes and heroines, such as American Molly Brown, were identified and celebrated by the press. The disaster and the mythology that has surrounded it have continued to fascinate millions."
 

Don Tweed

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Mar 30, 2006
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I feel it is simply everything. One cannot simply break it down to one aspect of the tragedy and find the answer. Ther are so many tangents and off-shoots to travel down and it all seems to come full circle back to the mystery of the quotient.
Friends and family at times find my "hobby" amusing. I tell them it is no hobby, it is a feeling I cannot shake. I will not speak for all members when I say that the Titanic is like a lover. Beautiful, mysterious, captivating and sad.
As a man once said, "there is no divorcing her ever."
I'm beginning to ramble.
Best regards, Don
 
Feb 21, 2003
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I agree with Don. There is no 'one thing' that draws one to Titanic. The story is so vast, compelling and complex. My family gave up telling me to give up my 'little hobby' years ago. They are very puzzled as to why I still study something that I know so well, I read and re-read books and even have given up a bedroom in my house for Titanic, so now I have one room less for family visits.

It all came to a head in April 2001 when I took my oldest sister (and loudest critic) to the Titanic exhibition in Seattle. After I got done telling her stories about Titanic, explaining to her about the artifacts she became very interested in the Titanic story. We were given cards with passengers names on them as we went into the exhibition. I told her something about the people who's names were on the cards. She asked me how I knew all of this, I answered "I have been studying this for over 35 years". I explained to her that Titanic is history, and like any historical event there is new knowledge to be gained, if you look hard enough.

Titanic.....Once you board her, you will never leave her!
 
Jul 12, 2003
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Hi Susan...I imagine that you kept your "boarding pass" when you saw the exhibit. What passenger were you? I saw the exhibit in LA and I was 3rd class passenger, Greda Dahlberg from Sweden.
 

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