Why did Edith Evans stay on the ship?

Thomas Krom

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Although this doesn't relate to the mystery serounding her death, in 2001 James Cameron send one of his ROV's down to the forward staterooms on A-deck. Sadly all the wooden walls have been eaten away but all the white painted, Cot brass bed (which were supplied by Hoskins and Sewell) of the outboard staterooms (which were bolted on the floor) are still in their same place as they were in 1912. This is a screenshot of A-29 her brass bed, which was Miss Evans her stateroom. The in-board staterooms had oak Cot beds and are sadly eaten away.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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There are about 4 pages of useless 'information' about Edith Evans in Judith Geller's book Titanic: Women and Children First. Like with most other subjects covered in it, there is a lot of author's fantasy with little fact that cannot be found in other sources. Geller speculates how Evans must have found the ship's magnificence, how warm and snug she must have been when the accident happened, how she watched the ship's lights disappear one by one and the floor giving way beneath her etc. All very well if Geller was writing a fictional poem about Edith Evans but worthless if one is after hard facts.....or at least 'soft' facts as told by survivors.
 
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There are about 4 pages of useless 'information' about Edith Evans in Judith Geller's book Titanic: Women and Children First. Like with most other subjects covered in it, there is a lot of author's fantasy with little fact that cannot be found in other sources. Geller speculates how Evans must have found the ship's magnificence, how warm and snug she must have been when the accident happened, how she watched the ship's lights disappear one by one and the floor giving way beneath her etc. All very well if Geller was writing a fictional poem about Edith Evans but worthless if one is after hard facts.....or at least 'soft' facts as told by survivors.
Something I've always wondered, was what stopped her from getting in? In Gracie's book (could be ANTR, its been a while since I've read it.) its described as an unseen obstacle. What do you think prevented her from getting into Collapsible D, Arun?
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Although this doesn't relate to the mystery serounding her death, in 2001 James Cameron send one of his ROV's down to the forward staterooms on A-deck. Sadly all the wooden walls have been eaten away but all the white painted, Cot brass bed (which were supplied by Hoskins and Sewell) of the outboard staterooms (which were bolted on the floor) are still in their same place as they were in 1912. This is a screenshot of A-29 her brass bed, which was Miss Evans her stateroom. The in-board staterooms had oak Cot beds and are sadly eaten away.
They were bolted? Neat. Somehow A-25's Brass Bed has considerably slid aft, to be touching where the wooden wall would be.
 

Arun Vajpey

Member
Something I've always wondered, was what stopped her from getting in? In Gracie's book (could be ANTR, its been a while since I've read it.) its described as an unseen obstacle. What do you think prevented her from getting into Collapsible D, Arun?

Why Edith Evans did not get into any lifeboat is a real mystery. Being in an A-deck cabin, she would have realized fairly early that there was trouble and I have read that by 12:25 she and the 3 sisters were aware that the ship was badly damaged and was likely to sink. But none of them got on board an earlier lifeboat despite being an all female group and it was not until 01:45 that Charlotte Appleton and Malvina Cornell left on Lifeboat #2. Caroline Brown stayed behind briefly with Edith Evans but left on Lifeboat #4 (I now believe that Mrs Brown was saved on Lifeboat #4 like she claimed and not on Collapsible D like Gracie thought).

IMO, the above suggests that the delay might have been due to Edith Evans' reluctance to get into a lifeboat and her companions might have spent time trying to persuade her to change her mind. I cannot comment on the truth about the "beware of the water" story but the fact that her family had lost relatives in the 1854 wreck of the Arctic and her own survival of the 1888 blizzard in which over 400 people died might have had something to do with it. My guess is that Charlotte Appleton and Malvina Cornell eventually gave up trying to persuade Edith and left on Lifeboat #2 while Caroline Brown stayed a few minutes longer before departing on #4. That parting seems to have been a deliberate act by Edith Evans (her telling Mrs Brown to go ahead as she had children etc) which suggests that the latter was rescued on Lifeboat #4. On the other hand, AB William Lucas' statement about the 2 women near Collapsible D almost 15 minutes later and whom he was unable to help points to one of them being Edith Evans.
 
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