Why didn't stewards inform the passengers?


Delia Mahoney

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Oct 10, 2003
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Hello everyone,
I have written recently first class passenger Elisabeth Allen's biography and started to wonder: why didn't stewards inform few passengers about collision with an iceberg? I hope someone can answer me to this question.

All the best,

Delia
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Jul 9, 2000
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They passed on what little information they had and what they were told to pass along. Anything held close was done with an eye towards avoiding a potential panic. When you have a surplus of passnegers and a chronic shortage of boats, there are some things you don't advertise.
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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Weren't the stewards misinformed about it and they thought it was not serious?

People though that the ship could not sink also, so there was not much panic till probably after 2.00. They were still 'skylarking and joking about it' as one survivor put it.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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"Misinformed" if they were even informed at all, might be a good way of putting it. Since the Captain and his officers had reletively few people they could depend on to keep a cool head in a crisis, and literally a shipload of people who couldn't be depended on, it's not hard to see why they would want to keep a lid on things.
 

Delia Mahoney

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Oct 10, 2003
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Very nice. Many people from first and second class died because the stewards were misinformed.
It's so bad organization...

All the best,

Delia
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S

Susan Leighton

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Very Nice! Let's all blame the stewards now....Yeah, that's it....if only the stewards had been properly informed....
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Very nice. Many people from first and second class died because the stewards were misinformed.
It's so bad organization... <<

Well...maybe. Communications is one of the first things to take it in the shorts when things go badly wrong and that hasn't changed one iota in the past century. The Titanic did not...to my knowladge...have a general alarm system, and I don't think it would have been used in any event. Justified or not (And towards the end, it appears that it was.) the poassibility of a major and uncontrollable panic was a very real concern. Historical precedents like the Atlantic and the Arctic were not unknowns and the lessons were not lost on contemporary mariners.

What it boils down to are cold, cruel numbers: A surplus of people and that destinct and inescapable shortage of boats I mentioned. When word of that gets around, how would it go down with those who would soon know that they would have no ticket off?

Somehow, I don't think it would have been "Okay, I'm going to either drown or feeze to death, and my whole family too, but that's allright. Them's the breaks!"

The crew did what they had to do. The "might have beens" fall under the catagory of Lessons learned.
 

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