Why do people dislike the 1997 Titanic movie?


Peter Kyhl

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I agree Cameron. I really don't like the movie from 1953. I like S.0.S. Titanic becuase it has so many real passenger and it was the first movie I saw.
 
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Southampton

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I was 6 years old when Titanic came out and although according to my parents I was already interested in the story of the ship from an early age (asking them to buy me books and tell me her story over and over again), I always associate my Titanic passion to this movie because it's part of my array of first Titanic-related memories. This is why I will always love this movie and will never be able to hate it.

Personally, I think if you look at it as what it is - a Hollywood movie - it does superbly what it's intended to do. I don't mind historical inaccuracies for the sake of artistic purposes (documentaries are the one form of media where I don't tolerate nor expect artistic licenses) and personally I think the inclusion of the fictional love story was incredibly smart and, honestly, necessary. Is it a good script? Not really. Is it an original love story? Not really. But it works. And the way this movie has become a staple of popular culture and how it's still so meaningful to so many people almost 30 years later is a testament to its quality, in my humble opinion.

Also, it bothers me to see the movie being reduced to just a romance story and a chick flick. Titanic is way more about the coming of age of a young woman (Rose) than about a love story. The love story is what propels Rose's freedom and growth, but the focus is still 100% on her and on what she wants. Now were there real young women aboard the ship with interesting and inspiring lives that could warrant a movie focused entirely on them? Yes (I personally love reading about Violet Jessop), but it would be a far more delicate subject to deal with and I'm not sure I'd want a Hollywood production to be the one doing that. Resorting to fictional characters provides greater freedom and with greater freedom comes more room to manipulate the characters in a way that the general audience feels not only invested in, but also connected to them. By hooking the audience on Jack and Rose, individually and as a couple, Cameron guaranteed that the audience would personally feel the sense of loss that comes with the tragedy. And the truth is, despite their strengths, all the other Titanic movies have failed in making me personally feel that sense of loss. I think that has precisely to do with the fact that most focus on the real passengers but never deep enough for you, as an audience member, to relate to any of them and feel personally gutted when they face tragedy. Titanic was the only one where I felt that metaphorical punch in the gut because I could finally put myself in someone's shoes (Rose). That's why I think the inclusion of fictional characters and a fictional love story was smart and necessary. And Cameron did this flawlessly because (as much as I don't like him for a variety of reasons) he's a master at emotion and a good story-teller.

But of course that's just me. I also think that society in general loves to mock anything that is popular among women and teenage girls and a lot of the hatred against this movie can be explained by that.
 
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I was 6 years old when Titanic came out and although according to my parents I was already interested in the story of the ship from an early age (asking them to buy me books and tell me her story over and over again), I always associate my Titanic passion to this movie because it's part of my array of first Titanic-related memories. This is why I will always love this movie and will never be able to hate it.

Personally, I think if you look at it as what it is - a Hollywood movie - it does superbly what it's intended to do. I don't mind historical inaccuracies for the sake of artistic purposes (documentaries are the one form of media where I don't tolerate nor expect artistic licenses) and personally I think the inclusion of the fictional love story was incredibly smart and, honestly, necessary. Is it a good script? Not really. Is it an original love story? Not really. But it works. And the way this movie has become a staple of popular culture and how it's still so meaningful to so many people almost 30 years later is a testament to its quality, in my humble opinion.

Also, it bothers me to see the movie being reduced to just a romance story and a chick flick. Titanic is way more about the coming of age of a young woman (Rose) than about a love story. The love story is what propels Rose's freedom and growth, but the focus is still 100% on her and on what she wants. Now were there real young women aboard the ship with interesting and inspiring lives that could warrant a movie focused entirely on them? Yes (I personally love reading about Violet Jessop), but it would be a far more delicate subject to deal with and I'm not sure I'd want a Hollywood production to be the one doing that. Resorting to fictional characters provides greater freedom and with greater freedom comes more room to manipulate the characters in a way that the general audience feels not only invested in, but also connected to them. By hooking the audience on Jack and Rose, individually and as a couple, Cameron guaranteed that the audience would personally feel the sense of loss that comes with the tragedy. And the truth is, despite their strengths, all the other Titanic movies have failed in making me personally feel that sense of loss. I think that has precisely to do with the fact that most focus on the real passengers but never deep enough for you, as an audience member, to relate to any of them and feel personally gutted when they face tragedy. Titanic was the only one where I felt that metaphorical punch in the gut because I could finally put myself in someone's shoes (Rose). That's why I think the inclusion of fictional characters and a fictional love story was smart and necessary. And Cameron did this flawlessly because (as much as I don't like him for a variety of reasons) he's a master at emotion and a good story-teller.

But of course that's just me. I also think that society in general loves to mock anything that is popular among women and teenage girls and a lot of the hatred against this movie can be explained by that.
There's nothing wrong with getting your motivation to like or study something from a movie. Yours happens to be Titanic. More power to you. There are hundreds of engineers and astronauts that admit their motivation to go into that was from watching Star Trek as a young person. And there are hundreds of archaeologists that admit their motivation was from watching Indiana Jones when they were young also. Get your motivation where you can find it. And if somebody gives you flak about it just tell them to go pound sand. Cheers.
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Cam Houseman

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Personally, I think if you look at it as what it is - a Hollywood movie - it does superbly what it's intended to do. I don't mind historical inaccuracies for the sake of artistic purposes (documentaries are the one form of media where I don't tolerate nor expect artistic licenses) and personally I think the inclusion of the fictional love story was incredibly smart and, honestly, necessary. Is it a good script? Not really. Is it an original love story? Not really. But it works. And the way this movie has become a staple of popular culture and how it's still so meaningful to so many people almost 30 years later is a testament to its quality, in my humble opinion.

I was 6 years old when Titanic came out and although according to my parents I was already interested in the story of the ship from an early age (asking them to buy me books and tell me her story over and over again), I always associate my Titanic passion to this movie because it's part of my array of first Titanic-related memories. This is why I will always love this movie and will never be able to hate it

Exactly! dramatic moments are put in because
-Lack of data
-for the story
-to move the plot along

As I said earlier in another post, the romantic subplot put in a Historical fiction movie really does draw in the numbers, as shown by box office Numbers. I too was brought in by an earlier documentary, I don't remember what it was, but I think it was about Ballard's expedition to find the ship, maybe "The Nightmare and the dream." I don't know, I was 6. The movie is what helped along my fascination, and will always be my favorite despites the flaws.
Also, it bothers me to see the movie being reduced to just a romance story and a chick flick. Titanic is way more about the coming of age of a young woman (Rose) than about a love story. The love story is what propels Rose's freedom and growth, but the focus is still 100% on her and on what she wants. Now were there real young women aboard the ship with interesting and inspiring lives that could warrant a movie focused entirely on them? Yes (I personally love reading about Violet Jessop), but it would be a far more delicate subject to deal with and I'm not sure I'd want a Hollywood production to be the one doing that. Resorting to fictional characters provides greater freedom and with greater freedom comes more room to manipulate the characters in a way that the general audience feels not only invested in, but also connected to them. By hooking the audience on Jack and Rose, individually and as a couple, Cameron guaranteed that the audience would personally feel the sense of loss that comes with the tragedy. And the truth is, despite their strengths, all the other Titanic movies have failed in making me personally feel that sense of loss. I think that has precisely to do with the fact that most focus on the real passengers but never deep enough for you, as an audience member, to relate to any of them and feel personally gutted when they face tragedy. Titanic was the only one where I felt that metaphorical punch in the gut because I could finally put myself in someone's shoes (Rose). That's why I think the inclusion of fictional characters and a fictional love story was smart and necessary. And Cameron did this flawlessly because (as much as I don't like him for a variety of reasons) he's a master at emotion and a good story-teller.
I agree, the movie is much more than just "Jack and Rose" its a "modern" (well, back then) of the Titanic's story, although strung with dramatic details here and there. Titanic 1997 built on the lives of the survivors an victims, gave them feelings and "life" if you will. Not many of the movies, except A Night to remember, does much with the historical characters except portray that character badly, erroneously, or just forgets them entirely like how Thomas Andrews wasn't in the 1996 Mini-series. the hard work that Jim Cameron put into the set should really fascinate everyone, regardless of if you like it or not. Jim Cameron has been the only person to actually "rebuild" Titanic nearly to her full extent. (Although I think the set was a little shorter than the real ship.)
But of course that's just me. I also think that society in general loves to mock anything that is popular among women and teenage girls and a lot of the hatred against this movie can be explained by that.
I am not so sure about this last one. People seem to dislike the movie for a couple reasons
1. the love story
2. inaccuracies
3. It wasn't a documentary which tried to get 100% of the facts correct

that kind of Society you mention seems to be the misogynist group. Normal people don't care. Its the weirdos who don't want to let people have any sort of opinion. Don't listen to them, be you. Aren't there male fans of that one kids show, the "My Little Pony" or something like that? And that primarily seems to be a girls show, but you're allowed to like what you like!

I believe being a woman shouldn't define what you are into, if you get my meaning. Many famous women throughout history are notable for their achievements and contributions to society. Jennifer Carter was the first woman to go to the Titanic's wreck, neat fact for you.

Anyway, hope this helps.

Best of luck! :)
 
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Generally speaking, I love the movie although I could also do with less of Jack and Rose (and Rose's awful mother!) However, my biggest complaint about the film is that Cameron chose to exclude the scene on the boat deck where Mr Strauss begs Mrs Strauss to get into a lifeboat, and she refuses point blank to do so. I have seen this in a compilation of deleted scenes on Youtube and it really would have been worthy of inclusion in the final cut. As it is, all we get is a brief shot of an elderly couple waiting on their bed for the inevitable end which, for viewers who are unaware of the Strauss story, is somewjat meaningless.
 

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