Why Lightoller left the sea

Charlene

Charlene

Member
I've been curious about this. Why he left the sea? He would have taken a new job as officer in another company, like Lord, and maybe he would have been named captain finally. Or maybe he considered that is name was too well known for that? Or maybe he missed his family?
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
Speaking from personal experience , my reason for "leaving the sea" was the same as the last one in your list.
I only served four years in the U.S. Navy and probably would have been eligible for promotion to Chief Petty Officer in another three years but I didn't re-enlist because I just wanted to be home again.
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
Just an aside on my previous post on my situation.:
When my promotion was read out at a meeting where the whole crew of that ship were present on that ship, I heard there were rumors of grumblings from some of the "old timers" in other divisions on that ship. :
"He just made First Class."
"He could be Chief in another three years !"
"But I heard he isn't going to re-enlist ! ? "
" Why in the xxxxxxxxxx (deleted by censor ) isn't he going to re-enlist !!!!!!! ? "
Just about everyone either made First Class or were eligible for promotion in four years on that division on that ship.
And the re-enlistment rate on that division on that ship in that navy , was , and had always been, Zero Per Cent.
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
I've been curious about this. Why he left the sea? He would have taken a new job as officer in another company, like Lord, and maybe he would have been named captain finally. Or maybe he considered that is name was too well known for that? Or maybe he missed his family?
I have seen some comments that there was such a stigma attached to the Titanic tragedy that no surviving officer would have had a chance for further advancement or even employment .
 
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Aly Jones

Member
I've been curious about this. Why he left the sea? He would have taken a new job as officer in another company, like Lord, and maybe he would have been named captain finally. Or maybe he considered that is name was too well known for that? Or maybe he missed his family?
I know inger sheil and dan parkes will know this answer.
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
I know inger sheil and dan parkes will know this answer.
Hopefully.
They will know the answer.
I'm just guessing. ?

This may be a little off-topic.
I am also curious about the Marconi Operators .
Not just Bride, Cottam and Evans, but all others.
Did any of them stay at their jobs and go on to higher positions ?
Or did they "leave the sea" ?
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
Since this is a discussion forum, I hope I'm not braking or bending the rules too much. :)
My questions :
(1) Would you say the question of "leaving the sea" is more or less of a question for the Merchant Marine or the Navy ?
(2) If in the Navy, same question.... Officers or Enlisted Men ?
(3) If in the Navy , same question...... Among different Specialist Ratings ?
(4) Of course Questions (2) and (3) could apply to similar persons in the Navy OR the Merchant Marine ?
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
I was thinking of my own experience in the Navy.
Officers were mostly "Career" persons.
Most Enlisted men in for only 4 years, but there were some "career" and also depends on different Ratings and Rates.

I was thinking , too , about the merchant marine..... rather they would be more of the career type and the question of "leaving the sea" would be something they normally would have not given a thought about it.
 
Julian Atkins

Julian Atkins

Member
Hello 'Mrf',


I think this provides some of the 'info' you are after.

There is a lot more detail on threads in this wonderful forum going back some 20 years or so; it is all there, but don't expect me to remember particular thread.

Cheers,

Julian
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
Hello 'Mrf',


I think this provides some of the 'info' you are after.

There is a lot more detail on threads in this wonderful forum going back some 20 years or so; it is all there, but don't expect me to remember particular thread.

Cheers,

Julian
Thanks, Julian for the information on Lightoller, especially the years after the Titanic disaster.
I think that one of the main reasons that Lightoller " left the sea " was because he realized that he would never be captain with White Star because " White Star wanted to forget Titanic and those connected with her...None of the other surviving officers ever became captains..."
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
Thanks, Julian for the information on Lightoller, especially the years after the Titanic disaster.
I think that one of the main reasons that Lightoller " left the sea " was because he realized that he would never be captain with White Star because " White Star wanted to forget Titanic and those connected with her...None of the other surviving officers ever became captains..."
I never really looked into it but how many went to different shipping lines? You would think some of the smaller lines like Blue and Red Star line would have picked them up.
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
Just an aside on my previous post on my situation.:
When my promotion was read out at a meeting where the whole crew of that ship were present on that ship, I heard there were rumors of grumblings from some of the "old timers" in other divisions on that ship. :
"He just made First Class."
"He could be Chief in another three years !"
"But I heard he isn't going to re-enlist ! ? "
" Why in the xxxxxxxxxx (deleted by censor ) isn't he going to re-enlist !!!!!!! ? "
Just about everyone either made First Class or were eligible for promotion in four years on that division on that ship.
And the re-enlistment rate on that division on that ship in that navy , was , and had always been, Zero Per Cent.
Old " Navy Joke " :)
" I'd rather be a PFC ( Poor Foolish Civilian ) than an ETC ( Electronic Technician Chief Petty Officer).". LOL
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
I never really looked into it but how many went to different shipping lines? You would think some of the smaller lines like Blue and Red Star line would have picked them up.
Interesting point, Steven-
I never really looked into it either. Is their some information somewhere about how the other surviving officers faired....Did they go on to some other lines ? ....Did the article infer that they never became captains with White Star or that they never became captains....period....with any other lines?
 
Julian Atkins

Julian Atkins

Member
Interesting point, Steven-
I never really looked into it either. Is their some information somewhere about how the other surviving officers faired....Did they go on to some other lines ? ....Did the article infer that they never became captains with White Star or that they never became captains....period....with any other lines?

I think there is pretty clear evidence of Lightoller and Boxhall taking command during WW1 in the RN reserve. Rostron went on to have a glorious career, as did his second officer Bissett from Carpathia days. Captain Lord went to the Latta Line after being forced to resign from Leyland Line, and plodded away in WW1 commanding ships - without Lightoller's 'swashbuckling' with an 'E' boat, that has never quite been resolved.

You can imagine Boxhall and Lightoller taking command in WW1, then being denied promotion with the White Star Line, yet having to keep on with the White Star Line because in those days you needed the company pension to secure you when you retired.

Groves got a command and did very well after Titanic after WW1, as did Captain Lord after a brief hiatus. Stewart also got a command.

Stone and Gibson did not.

Read into that what you will.

Cheers,

Julian
 
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