Worst scene from a Titanic film ever

  • Thread starter Hugo Rupert Talbot-Carey
  • Start date

May 12, 2005
3,109
13
233
In one of the TV shows about Titanic a few years ago there was a scene of a rape which was really offensive. That has to be the worst thing I've seen in a Titanic movie, although Leonardo di Caprio's spit-soaked chin was pretty gross, too!

I'm a fan of the 1953 Titanic so I don't feel the same way as others about the "Norman! Norman!" scene in the lifeboat. I found it pretty convincing. And the scene of the gloves is also one that affects me. I am always struck by the actress portraying Mrs. Straus in that movie, too. The tears welling in her eyes as she quietly but firmly refuses a place in a boat gets me every time.

But since we're talking about "worst" scenes - I think any scene in any film that EVER starred Marilu Henner is one to avoid (and Marilu Henner as Molly Brown should have ended the career of the casting director responsible for that joke).

I also think the scenes of Rose in the 1997 Titanic, in which she spits, shoots her middle finger, wields an axe and beats up a steward are so bad that you can't help but love them!
 
Jul 9, 2004
285
1
113
With all these bad moments I wonder if the very concept of the Titanic movie has made itself impractical and more along the lines of a practical joke to screenwriters than a serious movie genre.

Double Indemnity was in the genre "Baba" should have kept to. I recently saw a trailer for a movie with her and Henry Fonda... title being something that had to do with Eve. It looked awful.

Perhaps there were good moments in the '53 Titanic. I only remember the Mrs. Straus scene vaguely... but I think it was all right.

In a way... I'm glad I haven't seen Cameron's Titanic, especially after reading this topic.
 

John Melish

Member
May 17, 2004
31
0
86
The part where they go running by the stokers to the cargo hold annoys me as well as the whole Renault thing.
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,114
25
298
Among about 200 other things which had my teeth on edge was the whole "Leo Handcuffed To A Pipe" plot contrivance, which on top of being a trite suspense device which would have seemed stale in in 1927, was also incredibly superfluous

"Well, the ship has struck the iceberg and is sinking, but I'm not sure that can generate enough suspense. Let's introduce a faux jewel heist and have the villain handcuff Leo to a pipe."

"Isn't that akin to having the villain chain him to a railroad track? Why can't we just put him in a cabin with a jammed door?"

"Because that wouldn't pad the story out by twenty minutes."
 

Mindy Deckard

Member
Aug 29, 2005
123
1
111
Believe it or not but I still have a problem with the "I'll never let go, Jack" scene...like he would still be alive and able to talk at that time...

...WORST SCENE EVER!!! (Comic book guy voice)

I still silently cheer when Jack dies...

IMO...don't kill me!
 
Mar 17, 2006
27
0
81
- Jim Kalafus: You said: "Among about 200 other things which had my teeth on edge was the whole "Leo Handcuffed To A Pipe" plot contrivance, which on top of being a trite suspense device which would have seemed stale in in 1927, was also incredibly superfluous

"Well, the ship has struck the iceberg and is sinking, but I'm not sure that can generate enough suspense. Let's introduce a faux jewel heist and have the villain handcuff Leo to a pipe.""

Actually, the whole "Leo handcuffed to a pipe because he was accused of having stolen some jewel" storyline was taken straight off the German movie Titanic (1943).
In that movie, one of the character was accused to have stolen some jewels, one of them included a blue diamond(!), and thus he got handcuffed onto a pipe. Later on in the movie, another character, male in this version, frees him with an axe.

Not to mention that the scene of Rose looking up to Jack while she's being lowered down in a lifeboat in Titanic (1997) is also taken straight off Titanic (1943), only that in Titanic (1943), the woman doesn't go back to the Titanic from the lifeboats, but stays right there.

Also, the scene in Titanic (1997) where Rose tells her mother that the Titanic is sinking and that more than half of the people are going to die, has the dialogue based straight on the dialogue in the scene in Titanic (1943), where 1st officer von Petersen tells a woman from the 1st class that the Titanic is sinking, and that only a hundred people are going to be saved.

Also, about the fact that the dining room is a meter from the Grand Staircase in Titanic (1996) (the miniseries) - it's the same in Titanic (1943) as well.

And there's a scene in Titanic (1943), where Ismay yells at Captain Smith that he wants a place in a lifeboat, then 1st officer von Petersen comes, tells him to stop yelling, and that he's going to get a place in a lifeboat, but not to follow his orders, but instead, so that he can be taken in front of the maritime board so he can be taken accountable of his actions, and then Ismay leaves with an evil grin, as the 1st officer first tells him, and then yells at him "Bitte!" ("Please!").
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,114
25
298
>Actually, the whole "Leo handcuffed to a pipe because he was accused of having stolen some jewel" storyline was taken straight off the German movie Titanic (1943).

Oh, great. So, not only is it remarkably stupid, but it is also remarkably stupid and unoriginal. A pox on it, and upon all those who brought it forth.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,045
85
308
UK
Mr Kalafus, with due respect, you have misinterpreted my screenplay at this point. Is it not clear that in this scene the other cast members are exacting their revenge upon the ship by handcuffing it to Leo? A very severe punishment, granted, but they did feel rather let down in the circumstances.

JC
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,114
25
298
Oh, now I understand. That seems an exceptionally cruel thing to do to the ship. I interpreted the entire flashback as being one of those "Jack is already in hell but doesn't know it" Twilight Zone type of plots: trapped on a destined to sink ship with a half wit best friend (who speaks with a patently phony "atsa my boy!" Italian accent)and an obnoxious suicidal slut of a girlfriend who has the additional "baggage" of a fiance who developes a strange homerotic cat and mouse fixation on Jack (guess what the 'chained to a pipe' sequence was REALLY a lead- in to
happy.gif
) and a lot of dolts, who speak with phony upper class English and American accents. I saw clearly in the obligatory dance in steerage interlude, where the graceful and sylph like dancer was JACK and the lumbering heavy footed clod was Rose (seriously WHAT were they thinking when that scene was left intact?) that Jack was actually in one of the inner circles of hell. The tacky red sunset was, to me, a foreshadowing of hell fire as was Cal's obvious toupee and the 87th recycling of the intolerable Mrs Brown.

Now you tell me that I was wrong, and the film was actually about the SHIP being tormented and then punished! I am embarrassed!
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,045
85
308
UK
I can explain. The halfwit friend was due to budgetary restraints. With the money saved, we were able to provide Jack with an extra friend who was equipped with the other half. And two amusing accents for the price of one! Smart move, eh? Regarding Kate's feet, you will be aware that Leo is no artist, so it was necessary to provide him with my hands for the drawing scene. Likewise, Kate is no dancer so those are my feet you see in the steerage party scene. Painful, but necessary. Sorry about the toupee. We tried substituting my head for some scenes, but preview audiences were able to spot the difference.

JC
 
Feb 18, 2006
92
1
86
Lest we forget, much of the 1943 film was a product of Nazi Germany, Hitler & company trying to defame Our Lady! All the British come off as ineffectual twits and the only decent officer is, of course, the (non-existant) German one! I wonder if anyone left over from the Reich will sue?
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,114
25
298
>The halfwit friend was due to budgetary restraints.

If you had ONLY LISTENED TO ME, and used a dummy in the Dead Woman Floating in the Lounge Dome With the Lightbulbs That Burned Underwater segment instead of drowning several heavily insured extras until the shot was "just right," then Jack could have had two, or perhaps even three, friends who weren't idiots.

Similarly, filming the Looking For Mr Goodbar subplot in whch Jack picked up insecure women and~ after casual sex~ murdered them was not only prohibitively expensive (the hush money to the grieving families- the insurance payouts- the burial expenses) but also a total waste of funds. "We HAVE to make him a hero rather than an anti-hero" my backside! The real suspense generated by that subplot (would Jack bludgeon Rose with a lamp and strangle her after multiple stabs, as in Goodbar?) was definitely Oscar worthy. As you will no doubt recall, he was chasing Rose across the well deck with a tire iron from the Renault when they distracted Fleet in that version.

Similarly, all of the wonderful "Jack and Cal are gay lovers planning to eliminate Rose after the wedding for her insurance money" subplot footage cost a King's ransom and has never been seen.

The full hour you shot, but edited out, utilizing Helena Bonham Carter as Rose's vengeful (unmarried) older sister Midge, represented an insufferable cash drain although, admittedly, the sequence in which she hid the nude sketch of Rose inside of Captain Smith's Bible and it fell out during the hymn sing was a comic gem.

And, I'M SORRY, but NO ONE believed the footage you shot of the glowing cloud a la Bermuda Triangle descending upon the Californian and inpenetrably shrouding them until 4AM the next day. Of all the explanations I've heard of the Californian Incident, that was the WORST. That it survived through two rounds of preview showings puzzles me to this day.

Did you HAVE to drag Tammi Marihugh of The Last Voyage out of retirement to play Murdoch's panicking mistress trapped in the officers quarters? The retained suicide sequence was disgraceful enough, but a French mistress named "Babette" who constantly sings "A Naughty Naughty Girl Am I" and who inadvertantly causes her own death by shutting the train of her gown in Murdoch's bathroom door? Inane and a squandering of close to $20 million. And Tammi Marihugh? PLEASE!

The 'trick' casting of Senan Molony as the vengeful judge who sentenced Captain Lord to death only to see him rescued on the gallows by a miraculously saved Jack was brilliant, and I regret that when the film had to be edited down to a taut 4+ hours that was one of the interludes sacrificed. Along with the $7 million it cost to film all 5 minutes of it.

I've said enough. But, you should have budgeted yourself more carefully.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
6,045
85
308
UK
Mr Kalafus, say what you will about me, but I must protest at your continuing malignment of a wonderful and talented actress. I speak of course of Miss Marihugh. Who but she could have brought such depth, refinement and sheer annoyance to her debut role as 'screaming brat' in The Last Voyage? Witness her continued development in a series of pivotal roles in such landmark productions as And Now the Screaming Starts, Scream and Scream Again, and of course the British comedy classic Carry on Screaming. And Miss Marihugh is nothing if not adaptable. Who can forget her restrained performance in The Silent Scream, or her many hilarious comedy roles, each of which was a scream.

Had she not been otherwise engaged, of course, as technical advisor in Scream 1 and Scream 2, I would without hesitation have offered her the role of 'Rose' in Titanic. Miss Winslett is a great actress, but no screamer. I was therefore obliged to overdub my own voice for all of Kate's screaming scenes. And needless to say, my performance was inspired by a lifetime's admiration of the cinema's first and foremost scream queen. I treasure the congratulatory note penned by her own hand: "Couldn't have done better myself, Sir". And that, you must surely agree, is praise indeed.

JC
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,114
25
298
Sir; It was NOT my intent to malign the fine Miss Marihugh who "breathed life" into the character of Jill and made her the finest screen child since Ellie May in The Very Thought of You, or Phillippa in Never Say Goodbye. It WAS my intent to malign YOU for creating the role of "French Mistress" for Officer Murdoch and casting Tammi Marihugh in the part. And, to be honest, it was a relief when that whole subplot ended up on the cutting room floor along with all 8 of Miss Bates' musical numbers and the scene in which Cal and his valet finally consumate their odd relationship. Your explanation that "Babette" getting the train of her gown caught in Murdoch's bathroom door and slowly drowning as the cabin fills was a "homage" to both Dorothy Malone and The Last Voyage rang about as true as your explanation as to why there was a flashlight in the lifeboat.

>I treasure the congratulatory note penned by her own hand: "Couldn't have done better myself, Sir". And that, you must surely agree, is praise indeed.

Only a fool would argue that point with you, although I must ask if Tammi still dots her lower case "i" with smiley faces and hearts.

Now, the million dollar question: did you retain the footage of Murdoch's mistress freeing herself from the cabin by chewing through her gown at the last second (as you'll recall, he shoots himself when he sees her emerge, dripping, on the boat deck as the scene was originally scripted but with some clever editing you changed the whole focus of that interlude) and will it ever be available on DVD, or has it been destroyed? If you look VERY closely you can see that she is one of the people in the water on whom the funnel falls~ I guess that the expense of reshooting that segment was too much even for you!
 
Dec 3, 2005
168
2
113
Something just occurred to me. Back in 1990 an episode of The Simpsons came out where, through an unusual series of circumstances, Homer wound up trying to jump over a canyon on a skateboard. I recall him standing on the board mid-flight and screaming, "I'm the king of the world! Whooo!"

I can't believe that I didn't remember this sooner.
 

Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,114
25
298
JC- Your artwork is EXTREMELY derivative of that from Back Street. Derivative, as well, was the preamble you shot but deleted, in which "Old Rose" to whom we have not yet been introduced, is walking in a cemetery that looks amazingly like Fairview. She stoops to put roses on a grave marked "J.Dawson" and, unexpectedly, bloodied arms burst from the ground and drag her, screaming, towards hell. She then sits bolt upright in bed with a gasp- it was all a dream. The credits roll, and then we see the familiar "Rose sees her sketch on TV" scene. Jim, Jim, Jim..... we've ALL seen "Carrie," and when I saw, in previews, that you were using the Arms Bursting Out of the Grave plot device I was embarrassed for you. And, pardon me for pointing it out, but when Lovejoy chained Jack to the pipe and and then turned an hourglass upside down and said "The last one to die will see the others die before him. And his little dog, too...." you were HARDLY being as original as you thought. THANK FORTUNE you had time to scizzor that line out after the NYC preview audience laughed at it. MANY have wondered why you included the talking-chimp plot twist in which Molly Brown is conveniently travelling with a set of men's evening wear that actually fits Jack. FEW realize that, as originally scripted, there was a scene in which Jack forlornly sat in the First Class Lounge pondering what to wear to Cal's spiteful dinner party....suddenly his eyes fell upon the green velvet drapes and, after a brief semi-comic verbal tussle with a sassy black woman, Jack proudly entered the Dining Room clad in a sporty home made green velvet tux. Although SMARTER than the Molly Brown device you used, it more than passingly resembled Gone With the Wind.

I look forward to seeing all of this, and so much more, in The Untold Stories.
 
May 3, 2005
2,586
260
278
Hugo, this may be your first post, but I agree :

>>I cant really fault this film, but one film that really bugged me? Titanic starring Catherine Zeta-Jones and Tim Currey. I think its the one on American CBS Some members have alreasy reffered to. In all scenes this was a horrid attempt at a Titanic movie, the cast especially the supposed theif and hero,and Tim Curreys awfully bad acting in this film make it THE worst ive ever seen.<<

I hereby change my opinion....this movie replaces "Titanic" (1953) as "The" worst. You expect Ismay and/or the villainous steward to twirl their mustachios at any moment. At least we had Webb and Stanwyck to liven up the 1953 effort.
 
S

sharon rutman

Guest
The Titanic movie hall of shame is pretty long and distinguished. Here are a few lowlights:

The over the top Titanic-themed bar mitzvah scene in Keeping Up with the Steins (available this week on dvd)

Rose smugly smoking at the table just to annoy everyone. Ruth whispers "I don't like that Rose" and Cal counters with "She knows" as he yanks the cigarette holder out of Rose's hand.

Anne Archer's infamous "I can't put the wormy on the hooky" line from Raise the Titanic. (enough said).

"He's not your son," sneers Barbara Stanywick as she informs Clifton Webb that Norman is not his biological son, but the result of a one-night stand she had ages ago.

The disgusting rape scene involving Tim Curry from another Titanic flick.

Madeline Astor chirping endlessly about being pregnant in SOS Titanic.

Lightoller being accused as a "foreigner" or a "radical" by the elderly couple in A Night To Remember until Sylvia sets them straight!

I know everyone has their favorites, but these are the ones I remember best.
 

Similar threads

Similar threads