Worst scene from a Titanic film ever

  • Thread starter Hugo Rupert Talbot-Carey
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Dec 2, 2000
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>>The over the top Titanic-themed bar mitzvah scene in Keeping Up with the Steins (available this week on dvd)<<

Huh? That's a new one on me.

>>I know everyone has their favorites,<<

That part in the 1996 flick which has Captain Smith chewing out Will Murdoch for the collision bothers me. Nothing historical about that.
 
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sharon rutman

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You can't make this stuff up. I swear it's true--Keeping Up With The Steins comes out this week on DVD. Get it from Netfilx--that scene is a real jaw-dropper!! Wow--talk about bad taste.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Actually, if you have ever been to an over-the-top Bronx wedding, or outer suburb Bar Mitzvah, you'll see that the sequence was not too far removed from the truth and a rather clever send up of the affairs we've ALL been to if we live in NY and receive invitations. Steins did for the Bar Mitzvah what True Love did for the Bronx wedding....and I have little doubt that while the film Titanic was current such a prop was probably offered by some of the more outre catering halls. Having been at a similar female oriented affair in which a Cinderella coach made of flowers, and pulled by catering staff members, allowed the guest of honor to make a TRULY unforgettable processional around the dance floor, I can say with confidence that the combination of good money and dubious taste isn't EXACTLY rare in our corner of the world.
 
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sharon rutman

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Actually it's a no brainer on the worst Titanic scene of all time--it's Jack teaching Rose the fine art of spitting. Ugh! Was that really necessary? That scene grosses me out everytime.
 
Dec 3, 2005
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>>Actually it's a no brainer on the worst Titanic scene of all time--it's Jack teaching Rose the fine art of spitting. Ugh! Was that really necessary?<<

Sadly, yes. The modern audience has trouble distinguishing between the casual manners and bad manners. Jack teaching Rose to walk and talk like a working-class girl would have worked better.
 
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sharon rutman

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Sorry I disagree. I'm reasonably sure even poor girls learned that spitting was a crude and disgusting thing to do. That scene didn't advance the story and had no redeeming features. No matter what century you're in, spitting just for the heck of it is just plain bad manners.
 
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That's precisely what I mean. But modern people don't understand that. Lower-class girls are expected to spit now, not in 1912.
 
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It's a away of making Rose seem "liberated." Rebellion has essentially meant temper tantrums in mainstream Hollywood for the last half-century.
 
May 3, 2005
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Hugo-
>>one film that really bugged me? Titanic starring Catherine Zeta-Jones and Tim Currey.<<

Michael-
>>about the only thing redeeming about the production with Catherine Zeta-Jones was....<<

As one minority vote on the subject, IMHO, there was a fairly fine portrayal of Captain Rostron.If so, this was one (if only one) "thing redeeming
about the production....." :)
 
May 3, 2005
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Jim-

>>Jack proudly entered the Dining Room clad in a sporty home made green velvet tux.<<

Have you seen the episode on "Good Neighbors" of the suit of the same color ?

LOL Respectfully,

Robert
 
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sharon rutman

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Sorry gang, spitting is hardly liberating. What was Jack going to teach Rose for an encore? Belching? Nose-picking? Actually, the spitting had nothing to do with liberating Rose from her gilded corset--he was trying to teach her the fine art of doing guy stuff.
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Judging from Peter's use of quotation marks around the word liberated, thus adding an ironic tone to his post, and his follow up line, I'd say that he himself hardly views Rose's actions as an act of liberation. Looked more like a commentary on - and criticism of - Hollywood-scripting-by-the-numbers.

However clunky, pandering-to-90s-teen-sensibilities some of those scenes were, I disagree that any of them are a 'no brainer' for worst Titanic movie scene of all time. There are far to many [un]worthy contenders for that dubious honour to name just one standout - from Herr Pedersen the heroic Nazi role model and his attempts to save the day, all the way up (or down) to Tim Curry's rapist steward, chewing the scenery with his "You're a dead duck, laddie!" dialogue.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>all the way up (or down) to Tim Curry's rapist steward, chewing the scenery with his "You're a dead duck, laddie!" dialogue.<<

And about the only one who could pull it off in such a way as to make it not look like it was beyond stupid was Tim Curry. I wonder how it is he manages to get stuck with such roles. He's a very capable actor in my opinion and could do a lot better.
 
Dec 3, 2005
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>>Judging from Peter's use of quotation marks around the word liberated, thus adding an ironic tone to his post, and his follow up line, I'd say that he himself hardly views Rose's actions as an act of liberation. Looked more like a commentary on - and criticism of - Hollywood-scripting-by-the-numbers. <<

Yes, I'm brutally ironic. Spitting is more of 1970's "I am woman, hear me roar" than it is early 20th century "I am, being woman, hard beset." if Rose is meant to be the model of a strong woman. That's the defect of the script. The characters are all thoroughly late 20th Century. I blame actors, partially. I don't think that they have the sense of history nowadays to pull off a period role.
 

Jim Kalafus

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>Sorry gang, spitting is hardly liberating. What was Jack going to teach Rose for an encore?

The opposite of spitting. Sequence mercifully ended up on the cutting room floor.

>Rebellion has essentially meant temper tantrums in mainstream Hollywood for the last half-century.

Yes- and I dont know if you've picked up on this or not, but there is a remarkably sexist liberation=irrational, dangerous, (or stupid) behavior subtext to most films in which women become "liberated." The Gun In Betty Lou's Handbag. Titanic. She-Devils. Bonnie and Clyde. Even the praised- in- its- day- but- remarkably- stupid- as- a -film Thelma and Louise wraps the same old "give a woman her freedom and she isn't psychologically capable of handling it" theme in a P.C. package.

>I blame actors, partially. I don't think that they have the sense of history nowadays to pull off a period role.

Well, not everyone can be a Miliza Korjus!
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Myself- I blame stupid scripts. It is bad enough in a "B" movie but at least can, on a certain level, be rationalized away. But, films like Titanic offend because, frankly, the alleged scriptwriters, alleged historians, art directors, advisors ALL KNEW BETTER and opted to leave the stupidities in. The film reeked, and reeks, of "Who cares, they won't know the difference anyway." That is the ultimate in contempt for the viewing audience and, when you think about it, just the sort of elitist mindset the film's liberationist drag alleges to condemn! Which is why my teeth get set on edge when someone tires of this sort of conversation and says "relax- it is just a movie!"
 
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sharon rutman

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I don't blame the actors at all--they just follow whatever the director and screenwriters want. It's lousy screenwriting that's responsible for tacky scenes like the one we've been debating.
 

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