WRECK OUTTAKES from GHOSTS OF THE ABYSS


Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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Parks,
I just received my Commutator in the mail this weekend; I was quite pleased with the presentation, and the fresh look at the wreck. I look forward to examining part two.

I can sympathize with the pictures being printed darker than as seen on a computer. As someone who for many years was used to printing my book pages out at 600 dpi/120 lni, I got an 'eye-opener' when those same pictures were output on a new image-setter at 2400 dpi/133 lni. Improving the resolution also causes the picture to appear much darker, a disappointment the first time one of my columns appeared in print using the new equipment. On the screen, now - oftentimes the image has to appear somewhat 'blown out' to print as I desire it on the page.
 
Feb 14, 2011
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It was a superb article Ken.
One image that truly amazed me was the ceiling of the Reception room, which still retains decorative carvings and trim...
I look forward to reading Pt 2 of this article...
Regards

tarn Stephanos
 

Wade Sisson

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Jan 10, 2008
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Ken, what a wonderful thing to share with us here at the ET forum. Your paintings have been a rare and noble contribution to the study of Titanic. You have willed her back to life with the stroke of your artist brush. For that, my deepest thanks.

Wade Sisson
Kansas City, Mo.
 
Mar 3, 1998
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I saw the drafts for Part 2 of the Outtakes article today that will be coming out in the next Commutator. For those of you who have been patiently waiting for more images from the passenger accommodation, this is your issue. Look for interesting detail that Ken pulled out of wreck stills, like intact stairs on the GSC (E-Deck level), and Harry Harper's wardrobe.

Parks
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Michael,

If the hard-core Titanic enthusiasts don't salivate all over this upcoming issue, then I'll eat my hat. I think that it's pretty well established that I have little to no interest in the passenger accommodation, but I was absolutely floored by what I saw in these pictures.

Remember the glass and carafe on the washstand shelf? Well, there's more. Remember Ismay's sitting room? Well, there's more. The list goes on, and I don't want to steal all the thunder.

What happens is that Ken takes stills from the wreck video and composits them together to bring out detail and to provide a wider view than the ROV camera would normally provide. When you freeze a moment in time and enhance the detail, you begin to notice -- and more importantly, identify -- detail that you just couldn't take in when the camera was in motion. I can't count the number of times I have reveiwed the GSC footage, but it wasn't until yesterday that I saw surviving woodwork, thanks to Ken's eagle-eye and his amazing ability to pull detail from pixels.

I have to say at this point that when you receive the Commutator, it will not be immediately apparent how much work Ken puts into these images. He does his work so well that it's invisible to the viewer. Most will look like stills pulled from the wreck video...something that it would at first glance seem to be easy enough to do by anyone with access to the footage. But what isn't apparent is that it takes long hours of reviewing the video to spot items of interest, followed by the labourious process that I described above to bring out detail so that the item can be seen for what it is. Raw stills pulled from the footage yield only a certain amount of information. Stills composited and enhanced by Ken yield so much more that it would utterly astound you (it did me). It's probably the most challenging work that Ken has ever done, and he's doing it all because he wants to. He had the opportunity to turn these outtakes into a book, but instead decided to donate his time and effort in order to essentially give the information to the Titanic community, using the Commutator as a vehicle. Thanks should also be given to Jim Cameron, Earthship Productions and Walden Media, for allowing Ken to work on and freely share these images with us.

Parks
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Hi Parks
I am on pins and needles waiting for this next issue....
What im hoping to see in Ismay's suite was anything that may have belonged to him..clothes, or a suitcase...even a toothbrush....

What do you suppose was in that mysterious box in his closet?

I hope someday after these images appear in the Commutator, Ken can publish a book that elaborates on the first "Ghost of the Abyss" book, or have a special website with the all the images.....


Perhaps such will have to happen after the next expedition, when the Turkish Baths are explored....

The contributions Ken Marschall has given to the Titanic community over the years seems endless, and ranges from his art, to his compiling mosaics of the Ballard era photos of the wreck, and now compiling mosaics of the Cameron expedition photos of the wreck .
The importance of these contributions cannot be understated, and I think we are all in Kens debt.

Thanks Ken!
Thanks Parks!

Parks, in your upcoming book, will you use the father Brown double exposure photo of the wireless room, and do a few 'then and now' of that particualar view?

The curved pnuematic tubes seem to have been spotted, but the missing desk is a surprise...


One thing i hope can be located are the keys upon which Phillips tapped out the SOS....
Parks, what are the chances they still exist?

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Tarn,

<font color="#000066">What im hoping to see in Ismay's suite was anything that may have belonged to him..clothes, or a suitcase...even a toothbrush....

No personal effects, sorry.

<font color="#000066">What do you suppose was in that mysterious box in his closet?

I'm not the right person to speak about passenger effects. I have no idea.

<font color="#000066">Parks, in your upcoming book, will you use the father Brown double exposure photo of the wireless room, and do a few 'then and now' of that particualar view?

Oh, yes. An analysis of the Browne photograph will be the crown jewel of the book. I won't be able to show you a then/now comparison, because there's not enough left of the Marconi Room today to create a useable comparison, but I can show you what Browne was looking at in 1912, without the double exposure and in colour. And I can also show you some surprises that we uncovered as Ken and I painstakingly pulled the true image out of the double exposure.

<font color="#000066">Parks, what are the chances they still exist?

I have identified the mystery object in Stateroom Z as a possible candidate for one of the telegraph keys. I have sent pictures of it to Marconi historians/collectors, but as of this writing, they haven't arrived at a consensus. Hopefully, I'll have a conclusion by the time my book goes to press.

<font color="#000066">The curved pnuematic tubes seem to have been spotted, but the missing desk is a surprise...

You'll see more about the pneumatic tubes in Part 2. I found a collection of drawers that may be the remains of the Marconi Desk in Stateroom Z, but I can't be definite about that (you'll see one of the drawers -- with drawer pull attached -- in Part 2). The drawers could very well have come from officer staterooms farther forward.

Parks
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>If the hard-core Titanic enthusiasts don't salivate all over this upcoming issue, then I'll eat my hat.<<

Parks, I don't think you'll have to worry about changing your culinary tastes. I'm already salivating. I'm amazed that any portion of the Grand Staircase survived at all. The photos I've seen so far are those of the foundation framework at the base with zippo below that.

>>Thanks should also be given to Jim Cameron, Earthship Productions and Walden Media, for allowing Ken to work on and freely share these images with us.<<

Consider it done! And to Ken as well. He must have a pretty full plate now since by now he must be working on the next part of the series. Give him my best if you hear from him.
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Mar 3, 1998
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It was pointed out to me offline that it's not Harry Harper as I mentioned above, but Henry Harper. Sorry...I am not very knowledgeable about the passengers and their accommodations. During the course of the forensic analysis, I can't help but learn more and more about the accommodations, but I still depend on others for detail about the people who stayed in the staterooms.

Eh...whoever the guy was, he left his hat in his room on top of a pile of his clothes. If anyone knows where Mr. Harper is nowadays, please tell him to come pick up his stuff. He left his stateroom a real mess. :)

Parks
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Eh...whoever the guy was, he left his hat in his room on top of a pile of his clothes. If anyone knows where Mr. Harper is nowadays, please tell him to come pick up his stuff. He left his stateroom a real mess. :)<<

MR. HARPER!!!!! You left your hat in your quarters and didn't clean up your mess???? Drop down and give me fifty!
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Feb 14, 2011
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Parks, this may have been covered in Ken's writeup- ill need to reread it- But of the B deck cabins explored, which one seems to retain the largest percentage of intact paneling?

From what ive read, Ismay's suite-seems to be in better shape than the Cardeza counterpart, though my hunch is Cardeza's promenade is more intact than Ismay's...

Though the glass bowl for the ceiling light is gone, does a dangling wire remain?

Regarding the wirreless room region-
If the telepgraph keys(s) have been spotted, that is somthing I pray is retrieved and placed in a museum..

Regarding the Father Brown photo of the marconi room, I always wondered if that double exposure could be developed into two 2 seperate photographs..

How much time do you suppose lapsed between the taking of each exposure?

Likewise that Father Brown photo of 2 passengers by the portside crane on the aft port side of the boat deck has a faint double exposure image of Charlotte Cardeza's B deck promenade...

Do you suppose the Promenade image could be extraced, developed and enhanced?

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Tarn,

I'm going to defer answering your questions about the passenger accommodation until after the issue comes out. I remember some details that jumped out at me when I saw the drafts, but as far as comparing one area against another is concerned, it's not really my area of interest. When Part 2 comes out, you'll have the photographic evidence that will enable you to answer many of your own questions.

<font color="#000066">Regarding the wirreless room region- If the telepgraph keys(s) have been spotted, that is somthing I pray is retrieved and placed in a museum..

First of all, I didn't say that the telegraph keys have been spotted. There is an object in Stateroom W of which a portion can be seen protruding from debris. There are some electrical connectors on this object that appear to be of Marconi design. Based on the partial wiring pattern that I see, I suspect that the object might be a telegraph key. I have sent pictures to other Marconi experts, and while some agree with my assessment, others have pointed out discrepancies. As of the writing, there is no firm conclusion.

Secondly, Cameron is all about documenting, not retrieving. If the object is to be recovered, it would probably have to be done by someone else. Cameron's 2001 bots only carried cameras. That's why the retrieval of the stranded bot was such an amazing feat.

<font color="#000066">Regarding the Father Brown photo of the marconi room, I always wondered if that double exposure could be developed into two 2 seperate photographs..

Yes, it can. For my purposes, I picked one of the two exposures and worked only on that (you'll find out why when you read my analysis). Judging from the photo, Browne was standing in the forward port corner of the room, snapped the shutter, moved to his left (to starboard) about a foot or so, and then snapped the shutter again without advancing the film. The same items are seen in both exposures, but from slightly different angles. There is one component that is 99% erased by Bride's movement between snaps, which makes it appear like there's really nothing there (I expect people will disagree with me on this, but I have hard evidence -- the remaining 1% of the object -- that the "invisible" object is actually there).

<font color="#000066">Do you suppose the Promenade image could be extraced, developed and enhanced?

I haven't even looked at that one, so I can't really answer your question. I do know that one can do almost anything if one really focuses on the problem. I never thought that the Browne photo would ever reveal any information other than what's most obvious, but between Ken's talent with Photoshop and my knowledge of the apparatus, the two of us together were finally able to make complete sense of the mess. Neither one of us could have done it alone. It's not an easy process, though, I can tell you that, and I pursued a few false leads before I came across the correct answer.

Parks
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Hi Parks
Thanks very much for addressing my questions..

I eagerly look forward pt 2 of Ken's article, as well as your book.

Your quite right, im sure Ken's article will answer my questions..you cant blame me for being curious though... 8 )

I do hope someday some of the Marconi equipment could be recovered and restored to working order-
I realize recovery never was nor will be Camerons plan- but someday, I hope some operation will endeavor to recover some of the survivng marconi machinery..

It will be quite a feat, but well worth it...


One thing (of many) we learned from the amazing Cameron expedition, there is still much to be seen....

The Turkish baths, swimming bath and squash court top the list.....

Thanks again Parks...regards


Tarn Stephanos
 

Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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Hi, Tarn,
the Marconi double exposure photo is a somewhat easy task for PhotoShop to produce a single frame image. The A-deck promenade/Cardeza private promenade picture, however, IMO is a different matter. After a bit of adjusting, it's almost better to make the exposure a template, for me, and render an illustration from it. There's not enough of the picture, for one, to grab a clear self-sustaining image because the dominate image is not the same picture. The Marconi room one is different, as it's the same room, but just a slightly different angle, as Parks mentions above. Enough image exists so you can burn and dodge, adjust curves and levels, etc. to help bring out the details that are for the most part already there.
 

Mike Bull

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Dec 23, 2000
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I didn't quite realise until now that you don't actually have to be a member of the THS to buy the Commutator-so I've just ordered part 1 from their excellent website! Sadly I can't really afford to be a member year in year out, but likewise, I don't think I can afford to miss these three special issues.

I mean, dropping little nuggest like the fact that GSC stairs survive on E Dec; my God man, that's awesome!

And as for KM...Ballard has had his detractors, and people are in two camps over him; likewise the sadly recently late George Tulloch. But Ken has to be the purest champion of the Titanic any of us could wish for; the guy is awesome beyond words, and can't be thanked enough.

Looking forward to the arrival of my post from the THS now!
 

Jon Hollis

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Jan 23, 2004
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Ken and Parks or Parks and Ken. Have not been writing on this thread but reading with wonder and amazement not to mention umpteen tons of gratitude. You guys are really pros and the work you are doing is, if you will excuse the expression "Titanic" in proportions to previous research and public explanations. For you guys to take the time to answer all the persons who write in is exceptional. So keep up the good no, correction GREAT work. So Ken whats in the box the Rubyiat (sic) by any guess of the imagination? I supposedly went aboard but never showed up on the manifest as such. So was it given to the Captain or the Owner to transport? Hmmmmm...
Oh, Tarn and I have got some ideas about how the ship really broke but that will open one big can of worms so I am going to let Tarn start that one if he dares.
You might be interested in this. Some years ago I had some meetings with M.I.T and Eastman Kodak about old nitrate movie film. It was in researching Mr. Harbecks filming while on board. They both agreed that if he put the exposed film in film tins and taped them as most photographers do, Then as the ship sank the seal would have held for a time. At the bottom at 6,000+ pounds pressure per square inch the film inside the cans would have compressed itself very tightly on itself at the hub of the reel. Much like the inner pages of a book when immersed remain dry. So the theory was some of the film 'may' have stayed dry thanks to the pressure. Only problem how do you get it up maintaining that protective pressure? If you design a box to put the film in and recover it with that pressure then who is going to open the box? If the pressure is released then the film will loosen and no longer be dry. Plus as you know nitrate film is a wee bit flammable.
Oh well dream on McDuff
So again to you both many many super thanks for all this work you do for the benefit of us all. It is appreciated muchly indeed. All my sincerest and warmest best wishes to you both and all on the thread. Jon Hollis
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Jon,

Thank you very much for your comments, they are sincerely appreciated.

I don't hold much hope for surviving film, but after seeing the water carafe and drinking glasses standing on a washstand inside the wreck, I'm open to anything.

Parks
 

Jon Hollis

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Jan 23, 2004
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Thanks for the quick reply Sparks. As I said Kodak and MIT delved into this study and figures there might be a 60 percent or a little better chance that some images could be recovered at the very core of the film. Like you said after what has been found one wonders what else lies in wait for us to discover. I have always said that the deeper into the ship you go the better the chances of preservation. A Bowler in what looks to be great shape,Wonder if Edith Rosenbaums jewelry will ever be seen. Ah so many possibilities. Tried to reach Ken to convey my kudos to him for all this great work but had to leave a message on the machine. Also trying to find out if Father Perrone ever finished his "Normandie" model or how it is coming along and if any slight possibility of seeing any photos of it. Well let me quote a phrase from the TV series "Are You Being Served" by young Mr. Grace, "You are all doing very well." Indeed you are. so in Marconi'ese I will say, G.N.O.M. Cheers Jon
 

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