WRECK OUTTAKES from GHOSTS OF THE ABYSS


Mar 3, 1998
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I don't expect that the Commutator is about to show up in anyone's mailbox in the next few days. We haven't seen the authors' copies yet, and those usually arrive early. I'm sure it won't be long now, but not today.

Parks
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Parks, what is the expected release date for your book?
Let us all know if and when you'll take advance orders.
Thanks


Tarn Stephanos
 

Jon Hollis

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Jan 23, 2004
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> [Hi Parks long time no hear. Got my copy in the mail Monday and comment is WOW!!! Regret to say your tubes got cut a bit (I mean the ships) but Ken gave a wonderful apology about that. Again it arrived safe and again WOW. How will number 3 top this one. Hey Ken if your reading this and anyone else involved in this publication Hip Hip Hooray, Wunderbar, Magnifico, Bravo, Tak, and all other words that equal WOW. Cheers jon]
 

Dan Cherry

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Mar 3, 2000
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I look forward to reading part two so I can partake in the 'drool fest'! Ha!

Mail personnel are funny people. Sometimes they bend the "do not bend" package (like my Commutators), other times they leave a note for pick-up at the P.O.; other times they do me a favour in saving me a trip to the post office and throw it on my porch so it can get rained on...

Just out of curiosity, what is in the works for part three/conclusion?
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Jon,

Well, then, I stand corrected. It's not often that members' copies arrive before the authors' courtesy copies. THS seems to do things in unique ways.

Tarn,

My deadline is this Autumn, no specific date set yet. I have no control over distribution or sales, so I can't answer your question about advance copies. I'll put out word as soon as I get it. Right now, though, I'm focused on the material itself and meeting my deadline, so you probably won't hear much from me (about the book anyway) for a few months. I am working on a new marconigraph.com article now that will draw some imagery from the CG model that will be showcased in the book.

Parks
 

Jon Hollis

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Jan 23, 2004
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GET THE VACUUM CLEANER OUT
More "WOW" Wait until you all see the new Commutator Abyss Vol.2. The Derby hat is very visible. But,one of the most revealing is Edith Rosenbaums (Russell) cabin and how much of it is intact. I met with her many years ago at her home and what a girl. She told me she left with her pig but left her jewel box that was full of "real" not costume jewelry on the dresser. So Ken get the VAC out next time. Now your going to hate to hear this but she told me that before the ship broke apart she heard several distinct loud explosions which sounded like they were underwater, then she told me she saw the ship[ rear up and as it pulled apart the front end came up and those in the life boat said, "look it's going to float." Now that is what she told me, but I did not have a bible with me to make her swear to it or a pocket tape recorder.Later I would have such an item when I met many times with Eva Hart and she told me all about the dogs on board and the one she played with. That tape I still have.(Extra...LIGHTS, were all the lights out when the ship sank?? No!!)
So going back to the Commutator it is fantastic and will keep you engrossed for many many hours. Wait till the 3rd part comes out. So enjoy and Ed at THS and Ken and all involved in this publication KUDOS
Cheers Jon
 

Mike Bull

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Dec 23, 2000
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I received my copy of part 2 here in the UK this morning (Wow, great service again, THS!) and all I can say again is, AMAZING; I'm still taking it all in, but really, looking at some of those pictures of the staircase area in particular, I felt as if I was wearing a safety hat, and was walking/crawling around inside the old girl myself!

The quality of the images, the lighting, the care that has gone into identifying every little thing, the amount of the ship 'we' have now seen...staggering.

I remember how when 'ol Dr. Bob peeped in and saw a single dangling 'chandalier' in '86, and we all thought we'd climbed to the top of Everest, AND jumped up and down once we'd got there; but now, it truly feels as if this wreck has been explored properly.

If only the big JC would go back again, and aim for all the areas he couldn't get to this time; if only, if only...

Would it help if I begged?
 
Feb 14, 2011
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I cant wait to get this issue..
For THS members here, when did you join THS?
Anyone here join in the early 80s?

regards


tarn Stephanos
 

Mike Bull

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Dec 23, 2000
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Bad luck, Michael! I guess that's pretty odd-I'm not even a member or anything.

I know it's little consolation, but I always find the service given by American individuals/companies to be really excellent, when buying things over to here in the UK.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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I'm turning green with envy no more. My copy of The Titanic Commutator just arrived, and the Post Office didn't even bend it. As to the contents, all I can say, even after a curosory glance is "Breathtaking!" Good job to all involved!
 
May 12, 2005
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To all:

Just want to give a shout out to Ken Marschall for a great article and also my thanks to him for sending a copy of the Commutator last week.

Ken's "outtakes" footage and descriptions are fantastic and as I told him, this work of his shows him to be as much archaeologist as artist. The attention to detail in identifying elements in the wreck photos is much appreciated and the images are just stunning.

The sidebar deck diagrams supplied by George Behe and archival interior shots are fascinating in themselves and truly aid dummies like me to better understand just what's going on in the shots.

Phil G supplied most of the accompanying passenger photos, including what may be one of the most endearing portraits I've seen - that of the Beckwiths.

My own picture of Edith Russell in fashion pose (a different one than I lent for the GOTA book) is used in this issue, seeing publication for the first time since 1912. The original portrait, which is actually full length, was damaged a bit but Ken did his PhotoShop magic and voila. (At the time that picture of Edith was taken, 6 months after the disaster, she claimed to be 20 pounds underweight owing to her illness caused from exposure in the lifeboat).

I think the views of her cabin are exciting. I just can't get over the impact of that dressing table mirror, which you'd think should be shattered to bits. And her drinking glass still sitting on the shelf! It really is extraordinary.

Again, thanks Ken and THS!

Randy
 
Jan 5, 2001
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why there aren't remaining of the "a la carte " ristorant, Never in any expedition was told about of it. The ristorant was beautifull
just like the ristorant of 1st class of desk D.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Sandro, if you go to the B-Deck General Plan, you'll notice that the A La Carte Restaurant is located in the section of the ship that was heavily damaged when the ship broke up. If you go HERE you'll get a good snapshot by way of Roy Mengot's model of what this section looked like when the ship was found, and unfortunately, it hasn't improved in the past 19 years.

One might concievably get an ROV in there, but it would be a fairly dicey operation in a twisted mass of metal like that. Though some intrepid explorer may decide to have a go at it one day, I don't think I'd chance it.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Thanks Michael. but I don't understand for example, why there are intacts wood, windows, doors, in the ristorant of deck D, and there aren't remaining of the piano, when the piano is bigger than a door, why there aren't remaining of the glass dome when it was bigger and the glass didn´t desintegrate and were found chines, glasses intacts.And how can it be that were found baggages in the field debris but inside the wreckage room there was found none of them......?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Sandro, what we're dealing with here are random rates of decay based on where certain items are either within or outside of the wreck. That which was inside has enjoyed some measure of protection. The same could also be said of anything now buried in the sediment. The same cannotbe said of anything exposed outside the wreck or those furnishings and fixtures that were in the areas that were crushed when the midsection disintigrated.

As to things like luggage and also shoes, it helps to know that quite a bit of what was found is made of leather which the marine life finds to be unpalatable. Regarding glassware, china, and the like, some of it was protected by being in holders or cabinets, and survives to this day. What wasn't so protected or secured was destroyed.

I think in this case it helps to know that a sinking isn't a consistant or homogenous event where everything goes from step A to step B to step C in a consistant pattern, but a whole series of random and utterly unpredictable events where you can...for example...have the entire midsection destroyed and the stern section turned into an imploded mass of wreckage, yet leave the bow reletively intact and let a teacup settle unbroken on top of a boiler. I don't pretend to say there's any rhyme, logic, or reason to it, but that's what happens.
 
Feb 14, 2011
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One thing that stands out is the ammount of ceiling paneling that remains......
Even in the gutted Marconi room there appeared to be wood on the ceiling....
The traces or ornate carvings on the ceiling of the Reception room was remarkable..
This leaves me convinced- the Turkish Bath will be a breathtaking sight indeed, with her teakwood, marble fountain and tiled walls. Lets hope next time that room can be filmed..
Regards

tarn Stephanos
 

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