WTStead

R

Rolf Vonk

Guest
Hi Ben,

I didn't know that Ryerson told his wife that he would stay with John B. Thayer. The whole situation must have been strange, cause Thayer also left or lost his son. Why didn't they searched for eachother?

Any ideas?

Rolf
 

Thomas Ford

Member
Jun 22, 2010
47
0
36
well,whoever was in the smoking lounge,they must have a terrible death,the ship pitching up would have would have threw them against the walls,and in andrews' case right up against the stain glass wall and they all probably died when the ship broke in two or soon after.
 

Thomas Ford

Member
Jun 22, 2010
47
0
36
well,whoever was in the smoking lounge,they must have a terrible death,the ship pitching up would have threw them against the walls,and in andrews' case right up against the stain glass wall and they all probably died when the ship broke in two or soon after.
 
R

Rolf Vonk

Guest
Thomas,

I think all the people aboard had a terrible dead:

-being crushed by a funnel
-being sucked into the ship
-drowning
-freezing to dead
-burning by steam from the boilers
etc......

I think it isn't sure that Andrews was in the smoking room till the final end. We know he was there shortly before, but he might have going to another part of the ship. His cabin, for example, where he must have had the building plans of Titanic (also very emotional at such a moment).

Regards,
Rolf
 
B

Ben Thomas Sebastian Holme

Guest
Hi Rolf,

I agree, it is strange that the Thayer men didn't make more or an obvious effort to locate eachother. What's even more perculiar is that they both appeared to stay aroun the same part of the starboard boat deck at almost the same time i.e by the empty lifeboat davits......WEIRD!

Regards
Ben
 
B

Ben Thomas Sebastian Holme

Guest
Hi Rolf,

I agree, it is strange that the Thayer men didn't make more or an obvious effort to locate eachother. What's even more perculiar is that they both appeared to stay around the same part of the starboard boat deck at almost exactly the same time i.e by the empty lifeboat davits......WEIRD!

Regards
Ben
 
R

Rolf Vonk

Guest
Hey Ben,

Were they both at the starboard side? I can't believe this. How was the relation between father, mother and son? I heard the Carters had always quarrel aboard, so it isn't strange that they left each other when they boarded the lifeboats. But it stays a guess why the Thayers didn't search for eachother. What about Harry Widener? Did he stay with his father after the lowering of boat #4?

I'm looking forward to your responses!

Regards,
Rolf
 
B

Ben Thomas Sebastian Holme

Guest
Hi Rolf,

I haven't read anything that suggests the relationships within the Thayer family were anything other than stable.
I will quote you a passage from Michael Davie's book that outlines the circumstances for their seperation at boat #4.

"...Mr Wild, the chief officer, told us to go down onto A-deck and get into a boat they were loading from there. Father and mother went ahead -
your son (Milton Long) and I followed. A crowd pushed ahead of us and we could not find my mother or father when we were able to pass on, so thinking they had managed to get off in a boat we went to the starboard side of the boat deck".

(From Jack Thayer's account)

I'd imagine that Harry Widener remained with his father until the end. Col. Gracie vaguely remembered him standing by his father and John Thayer. Those three eventually deicided to head for the stern...probably.

Hope this helps

Regards
Ben
 
R

Rolf Vonk

Guest
Hi Ben,

Thanks for your information! It's good to know that the Thayers lost each other in a crowd. Though strange that they didn't find each other back before the ship went down. They had an hour to look for eachother and they only stayed on the first class decks. It seems logically that Harry Widener stayed with George. I know that Gracie saw Widener and Thayer together with other first class passengers, but I'm not sure if Gracie saw Harry Widener among them. I've hear about the story that Harry Widener went back to his cabin to get some rare books, but that story proved to be false.

Regards,
Rolf