Your favorite movie


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sharon rutman

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A Night To Remember still rocks, even after all this time.
 
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sharon rutman

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I couldn' pick out a Titanic documentary I liked because the more recent ones fawn all over how great Bob Ballard is and swoon over his endless pontificating. What a turn off.

Another turn off is the fact that ALL documentaries focus on male experts only. The only time a woman is featured prominently is if she is either a survivor or the descendant of a survivor. Another turn off.
 
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>>If Titanic is supposed to be somewhere on my list, ignore this posting...

But, my favorite movie is To Kill A Mockingbird.<<

My Titanic listing is in a previous posting, but my favorite movie of all times is "The Big Show", a "Grade-B Western" starring Gene Autry....if only it had been in technicolor. :-( and LOL.
 

Sam Brannigan

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Feb 24, 2007
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I agree with Sharon regarding the documentaries - the one thing I hate most though about many recent efforts is that if a documentary lasts for an hour, it seems like at least twenty minutes is taken up with:

a) shots of blokes getting into submersibles

b) shots of blokes getting out of submersibles

c) batteries or electrical faults being fixed on submersibles (with "exciting" will-it-be-fixed-in-time-for-the-big-storm-coming sub plot)

d) the usual aborted after five minutes of reaching the bottom dive.

e) shots of divers swimming around submersibles.

f) and interminable on board discussions about weather, course adjustments, pictures of families waving the ship off, and greeting it home etc etc.

Sometimes I wish they'd never discovered the ship!
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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You forgot to mention g) lengthy shots of blokes in submersibles saying repeatedly "Wow! I can't believe it! This is really the Titanic!" (etc). And, worst of all, the multi-screen sequences where what we really want to see (ie the Titanic) is zoomed out to a small image in one corner of the screen while the rest is filled with a-f above.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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If you don't like the documentaries were everybody is climbing in and out of submersibles, and bemoaning their troubles with faults and the weather, then there's an IMAX film out there you'll all love. "Titanica" is it's title if I recall correctly, but it's all Titanic and nothing but Titanic wreck photography.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Various edits of Titanica have been released, Mike, some shorter and others longer than the original IMAX theatrical release. The version I have is around 70 minutes, but the longest I think is 95 minutes and the shortest 40 minutes, which I'm guessing is the version you've seen if it consisted only of underwater footage. In the longer versions the underwater stuff doesn't appear until about 20 minutes into the running time (just after the shots of blokes climbing into submersibles!) The remainder is the usual mix of wreck footage and general historical documentary. All content is of a good standard, so you might want to seek out a longer version.
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Jason D. Tiller

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quote:

Another turn off is the fact that ALL documentaries focus on male experts only.
Ahhh...not quite, Sharon. You're forgetting Dr. Lori Johnston who is a microbiologist and has been featured in three Titanic documentaries; Ghosts of the Abyss (2003), Titanic Adventure (2005), and Last Mysteries of the Titanic (2005).​
 
Dec 2, 2000
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In fairness, if a lot of the Titanic documentaries focus on male experts, it may well be that the ones of a fairly recent vintage are very technical in nature. While there is no reason whatever that women can't do as well if not better then any of the guys in this area, you first have to get them to take an interest.

Unfortunately, not a lot have, and I think this is a loss as women are hardly wanting for talant.
 

Sam Brannigan

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I should omit the excellent documentary with Parks from my criticisms above, and not just because he has frequented this message board.

Does anyone else look at all the Titanic experts and commentators on these documentaries and think "Who are you?"

You would think they would all be major contributors to this forum if they were so authoritative.

I do think that there has been too much emphasis on documentaries about exploring the wreck and not enough about the social mores and other endlessly fascinating aspects of the disaster and the Edwardian period in general.

The again, I suppose the programme makers have to reach as wide an audience as possible.
 

Jason D. Tiller

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quote:

In fairness, if a lot of the Titanic documentaries focus on male experts, it may well be that the ones of a fairly recent vintage are very technical in nature.
I agree, Mike and figured that's what Sharon was getting at, but since Dr. Johnston is specialized in the field of microbiology and what is eating away at Titanic's hull, she deserves to be mentioned as a expert in her own right.

Having said that, I also concur with you that there aren't enough women interested in the technical aspects of the ship. They are largely outnumbered by their male counterparts.​
 
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sharon rutman

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Thank you Sam--most documentaries do waste so much time showing snotty scientists and technicians climbing in and out of those unsafe looking submersibles and then they have the nerve to complain about all the technical problems and dangers they face on their way to the bottom. Why even bother going to view the wreck in the first place if it's such an inconvenience?

Of course the researchers who concentrate on only the technical aspects of the wreck are going to be men--speaking as a women, my eyes glaze over in sheer boredom over the analysis of rusticles, how fast the Titanic is deteriorating, sonograms of the ship's hull and so on. There's more to the Titanic all that dull technical guy stuff!

It would be nice to focus on the social history surrounding the Titanic or the ethnic backgrounds of the passengers. Or what about the impact the Titanic still has after nearly a century? Or how about a debate challenging Bob Ballard's supremacy over the artifacts being salvaged? That actually might be interesting!?

Also has anyone noticed that Titanic research is also being divided into the haves and have nots? Translation--it's being divided into those who have seen the Titanic up close and personal and those unfortunates who will never have that chance. It's getting ugly out there!

Meanwhile, I'm still stuck in Rose's tight corset.
 
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>>Translation--it's being divided into those who have seen the Titanic up close and personal and those unfortunates who will never have that chance. <<

I'm sure that Bruce Beveridge, and Steve Hall would find that amusing in light of the landmark book they're about to get published which goes into the Titanic herself as a functioning ship. Neither of whom have ever been down to the ship.

>>speaking as a women, my eyes glaze over in sheer boredom over the analysis of rusticles,<<

Even with Dr. Lori Johnston doing a signifigant portion of the work, and who has been noticably getting the attention for it in the past few years?

>>It's getting ugly out there! <<

It's always been ugly out there on one level or another. I'd love to be able to say that every Titanic/liner researcher out there is a great guy/gal who could always be trusted, would never mislead anybody about source material, or stab their chums in the back, but it wouldn't be true. People have a funny habit of persisting in being people with all the baggage that comes with the deal. There are lot's of divides and rankling animosities out there over a lot of issues from the forensics and the Californian, to how Sir Cosmo and Lady Duff-Gorden behaved in a lifeboat.

A divide between people who have been down to the wreck or not just isn't on the radar screen. At least not in the sense implied here.
 
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sharon rutman

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you can be female and still be totally boring. CSI Titanic just doesn't cut it.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>you can be female and still be totally boring. CSI Titanic just doesn't cut it.<<

Maybe for you it doesn't, and that's your right. The interests of others vary however and that's their right. Seems kind of odd to me that you complain about women not having their say, and yet you complain about one...with a Ph.D no less...who has been having a say.
 
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sharon rutman

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How about all the scientific jargon that lay people just can't possibly begin to understand that's become part of most Titanic documentaries. It's like being on the outside looking in. In the future, all documentaries should be done in plain English only so everyone can understand what's going on.
 
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sharon rutman

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Besides, I've never heard of Dr Lori Johnston before. Women don't get enough airtime. See what I mean?
 

Sam Brannigan

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Feb 24, 2007
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Sharon, I wouldn't describe the scientists and technicians as "snotty".

My original criticism had more to do with the editing process for many of these documentaries, which I would assume is mostly down to the production team, which tries to create dramatic tension.

I agree with you that I find many of the more technical discussions a bit boring, but usually because I have come across them before. It seems to take years for much of the cutting edge research discussed on this site to reach mainstream TV, by which time we are pretty well versed in it.

I would like to see more emphasis on the social context of the Titanic, rather than the usual bland "microcosm of society" approach.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>How about all the scientific jargon that lay people just can't possibly begin to understand that's become part of most Titanic documentaries. <<

What does that have to do with anything? Technical and scientific jargon is something anybody can learn, male or female. Hell, I'm just a humble high school grad and I have no problem grasping any of that or looking up and researching what I don't know...or for that matter, just asking questions rightr here on the forum of those who do know.

And since forensics issues have been the focus of the latest documentaries, it would be pretty dishonest of the producers and contributors to not use the scientifically and technically correct terminology.

>>In the future, all documentaries should be done in plain English only so everyone can understand what's going on.<<

Oh really? I thought they were using plain english.

>>Besides, I've never heard of Dr Lori Johnston before. Women don't get enough airtime. See what I mean?<<

How strange, since most everybody here seems to know exactly who she is. She's published right here on ET in an article which she co-authored with Dr. Roy Cullimore. (See https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/item/1478/ )

And by the way, weren't you the one who said "CSI Titanic just doesn't cut it." in response to my pointing out Dr. Johnston's contribution to Titanic related research? Face the facts, getting all riled up about the lack of attention female researchers receive wears mighty thin when you trivialize somebody who makes a contribution in a very big and important way.
 

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