YOUTUBE THE MAKING OF A NIGHT TO REMEMBER


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Ernie Luck

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Nov 24, 2004
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Hi Gustavo

This is on the back of the DVD of ANTR. I wonder if it can legitimately be posted on youtube or whether it breaches copyright?
 

Ernie Luck

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Nov 24, 2004
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Hi Gustavo

I was not implying you did it. It just seems that everything is fair game these days when it comes to copying other peoples productions.

I am sure someone knowledgeable on this subject will comment in due course.
 
Jul 12, 2005
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In addition to being released as a DVD, the "Making of A Night to Remember" was also released with the feature "A Night to Remember" on CD-ROM. My library has that version of the production. Robert H. Gibbons
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I am sure someone knowledgeable on this subject will comment in due course.<<

Copyright can be a real minefield. I'm not sure of the status of anything on YouTube. They seem to operate in something of a gray area but I wouldn't take it as a given that what's posted there is legally A-Okay.

When in doubt, the best course is to ask an attorney who is trained and qualified in copyright law. Be mindful of the fact that Encyclopedia Titanica operates under the laws of the United Kingdom as well as any international treaties and agreements the UK is a party to.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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The YouTube policy on copyright is outlined here:

http://www.youtube.com/t/howto_copyright

It appears that YouTube do not inspect or police the uploadings, and unless they receive a formal complaint from a copyright owner they make no move to remove illegal material. The member who posted the 'Making of' docu has in fact posted his whole Titanic collection, including in their entireties the 1943 German Titanic, the 1953 Hollywood Titanic and 'Raise the Titanic'.
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Well, there's no crime in viewing. Just distributing or downloading. A viewer on YouTube isn't infringing on anything. The person who uploaded is the infringer, not the viewer.

So, there's really nothing to beware of unless you plan on downloading them and burning them to disc rather than buying them.

The material on YouTube is 320x240 pixel dimensions and broken up into 10 minute increments. So, burning to a DVD which uses 720x480 pixel dimensions...you may as well watch it underwater (that wasn't meant as a joke given the subject metter, BTW). If you're THAT determined not to pay for something at that point, have at it.

And...if you're not happy about these films being posted, contact Kino, Fox and whoever "Raise" is held by.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Well, there's no crime in viewing.<<

Maybe not, but don't be so sure. There are electronically transcribed books on The Gutenberg Project website which may not be legally accessed or viewed in the United States because of copyright issues and there's no reason to suppose that such laws wouldn't extend to other media as well.

Make no assumptions.
 

Ernie Luck

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Nov 24, 2004
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Interesting headlines in some UK newspapers today.

"People who illegally download films and music will be cut off from the Internet under new legislative proposals to be unveiled next week. Internet service providers will be legally required to take action against users who access pirated material". Make sure your wireless system is protected from other users or you could get the blame for their abuse.
 
Feb 21, 2005
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Sounds like they're referring more to downloads like someone would do on Kazaa, Limewire or BitTorrent, etc. Either way...yikes! Cut off from the internet completely? People running internet-based home businesses better be especially careful. For some it sounds like it could easily be bye-bye paycheck too. It wouldn't surprise me to see the United States do something like that before too long.

Youtube does seem to operate in a gray area as Mike said, but they're getting more and more negative attention for it all the time. I had put Nacht und Eis back up there earlier today but chose to take it down just to avoid the chance of any problems. I guess it always is better to be safe than sorry.
 
Mar 7, 2006
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Quote:

Well, there's no crime in viewing. Just distributing or downloading. A viewer on YouTube isn't infringing on anything. The person who uploaded is the infringer, not the viewer.

unquote:

By viewing a video on YouTube, the video file has been copied down to your PC (the red line shows the progress). You have effectively downloaded it, possibly without realizing it.

By the time you have it, it may have gone through much copying, as long as it can be proved that it came from the original copyrighted work, then the copyright has been infringed.

James.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Youtube does seem to operate in a gray area as Mike said, but they're getting more and more negative attention for it all the time.<<

Not just YouTube either but any of the sites that download for MP3's and the like. This has been quite a sore spot for the music recording industry and they're tending to go after just about anyone who downloads stuff, whether they actually download anything or not. They tend to win out through sheer intimidation and the fact that most of the people they go after don't have the deep pockets needed to fight a lawsuit.

If you have anything in your computer from any of these sources, cleaning it out might be a good idea.
 
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