Charles John Joughin, Titanic's chief baker

Charles John Joughin, Titanic's chief baker was born in Patten Street, West Float, Birkenhead, Cheshire, England, on August 3, 1878, went to sea at age 11, later becoming chief baker on various White Star Line steamships.

After surviving the Titanic disaster, he returned to England, and was one of the crew members who reported to testify at the British Inquiry headed by Lord Mersey.

In 1920, Joughin moved permanently to the United States to Paterson, New Jersey. Later he was also saved from the S.S. Oregon, which sank in Boston Harbour. Before retiring in 1944, he served on various ships operated by American Export Line as well as WWII troop transports.

He divorced shortly thereafter, however, a daughter Agnes was born from that marriage. After moving back to New Jersey, he remarried Mrs. Annie E. Ripley, and together raised Annie's daughter Rose.

Annie's death in 1943 was a great loss from which he never recovered. 12 years later he described his experiences in a chapter of Walter Lord's book, A Night to Remember.

Soon afterwards, his health rapidly declined, dying in a Paterson hospital on December 9, 1956 after two weeks with pneumonia at the age of 78 being buried alongside his wife in the Cedar Lawn Cemetery, Paterson, New Jersey.

His daughter Agnes never married and has passed away. His stepdaughter Rose, now Mrs. Henry Stoer, still resides in New Jersey.

Related Biographies:

Charles John Joughin

Relates to Place:

Paterson, New Jersey, United States

Acknowledgements

Michael Findlay, USA
Philip Allen, UK

Contributor

Brian Ticehurst