GIVE LIGHTHOUSE FOR TITANIC'S DEAD

New York Times

Tower on Seamen's Institute Dedicated Before Those Who Created It
---
TRIBUTES OF CLERGYMEN
---
Light Will Shine for All Lower Harbor, and Time Ball Will Indicate Exact Noon
---
With services commemorating the heroism and sacrifice of the officers, crew, and passengers who went to their death with the Titanic, just one year ago yesterday, the Titanic Memorial Lighthouse Tower and Time Ball were dedicated yesterday afternoon at the Seamen's Church Institute, 25 South Street, in the presence of more than 200 persons. Many were relatives and friends of the victims of that disaster.

About the time that the services at the Seamen's Church Institute were concluded a large crowd gathered in the Straus Memorial Hall of the Educational Alliance, East Broadway and Jefferson Street, to honor the memory of Mr. and Mrs. Isidor Straus, who perished with the Titanic. And again there were memorial services in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Straus last night at Public School 62, at Hester and Essex Streets.

The services at the Seamen's Church Institute were opened with a hymn by the choir of St. Andrew's Church, Richmond, S. I. A prayer was offered by Archibald R. Mansfield, Superintendent of the Institute, who also read the lesson from Corinthians, Chapter XV, verses 53-58. Following hymns and prayers the Rt. Rev. David H. Greer, Bishop of New York, delivered an address and conducted the dedicatory services.

Bishop Greer's Tribute

"The service that brings us together to-day," said Bishop Greer, "is of great significance. We commemorate the exhibition of some of the finest and noblest elements of human nature. But this memorial service is something more than that. It is meant to perpetuate not only the human values on that occasion lost, but the human values on that occasion found, which were then revealed.

Bishop Greer then read the lines of dedication:

[“]To the glory of Almighty God, and in loving memory of those passengers, oficers, and crew who lost their lives in the foundering of the steamship Titanic, on April 15. 1912, I, David Hummell Greer, Bishop of New York, and President of the Seamen's Church Institute of New York, do solemnly dedicate the Titanic Memorial Lighthouse Tower. As its light by night shall guide pilgrims and seafaring men from every clime into this port, so may they follow Him who is the Light of Life across the waves of this troublesome world to everlasting life; and, looking at noon toward this place to note the time of day, may they remember that our days pass as the swift ships, and in view of the shortness and uncertainty of human life, strive to fulfill their duty well, as the beat preparation for Eternity. Amen.["]

The Rev. Dr. William P. Merrill, pastor of the Brick Presbyterian Church, was the next speaker.

Their Lesson for To-Day

"We are here above all else," said Dr. Merrill, "to refresh ourselves in the inspiration of bravery and heroism. The one great desire of the present time seems to be to live and succeed. To look death squarely in the eye and tell him to go about his business is the supreme need of our day. The supreme achievement is to die well.

"And so those men and women, who, it is often asserted, 'did nothing but die,' are of more worth to us than men and women of great achievement. The chief lesson of this day is that suffering may be sometimes greater than action, and that death may be sometimes more glorious than life---that the supreme glory of life is to assert itself nobly in the presence of death."

A high tribute to the memory of the Titanic victims was then paid by the Rev. Dr. Henry Lubeck, rector of Zion and St. Timothy Church, following which Bishop Greer spoke with praise of the work of Superintendent Mansfield of the Seamen's Church Institute, and of the activities of Edmund L. Baylies, Chairman of the Building Committee, who, he said, had more than ony [sic] one else---[sic] interested the public in the institution and obtained funds for its new home.

Mr. Baylies, responding, gave credit for the location of the Titanic Memorial Lighthouse on the roof of the Seamen's Church Institute, to the two societies active in raising the fund to erect the memorial---the Seamen's Benefit Society, of which Miss Catherine S. Leverich is President; and the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, of which Dr. George F. Kunz, Vice President of Tiffany & Co., is President. Mr. Baylies invited all those present to visit the institution after its completion, and when the services were concluded, he took them on an inspection tour of the building, which has just been completed at a cost of $1,250,000.

The memorial tower that was dedicated is identical with the accepted form of lighthouse with stairs in the rear, a lantern gallery, and a fixed green light which will shine out over New York Harbor and be visible to all the lower anchorage down through the Narrows to Sandy Hook. Surmounting the tower is a time ball, to be hoisted to the top of a steel rod five minutes before 12 o'clock each noon and dropped when the time is flashed over the wires from Washington.

Members of the Building Committee of the Seamen's Church Institute who were on the stage were Edmund L. Baylies, Chairman; Herbert Barber; Charles W. Bowring, Henry L. Hobart, Benjamin R. C. Low, Henry Lewis Morris, John Seely Ward, J. Frederick Tams, and Miss Irene K. Lane, Secretary. Of the Advisory Committee there were Robert S. Brewster and Francis Lynde Stetson.

In the audience were John A. McKim, ex-Senator Lispenard Stewart, Mrs. J. Kennedy Todd, Miss Grace Potter, Mrs. Winthrop Gray, Warren Delano, Anton A. Raven, Dallas B. Pratt, Commodore of the New York Yacht Club; Edward N. Tailer, Miss Mabel Van Rensselaer, Miss Gertrude Hoyt, Gerardus Beekman, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Opdyke, Mrs. Frederick Nathan, Henry Lewis Morris, and J. Joyce Broderick.

Contributor

Mark Baber

500
Leave a comment...