HOME NEWS GAVE CITY FIRST NEWS OF CARPATHIA'S LANDING

Daily Home News

New Brunswick received the news of the landing of the Carpathia with the rescued Titanic passengers, from the Home News last night. The details of the landing and the passengers’ stories of the disaster, were wired to this office direct, and other bulletins were caught by the wireless. For three hours the news came in this way, and was at once bulletined to the Home News’ uptown office. A great crowd watched the bulletins and showed the deepest interest in the news.

Yesterday afternoon’s reports indicated that the Carpathia would not dock until this morning, and the message that she had arrived and would land about 9 p.m., came as a surprise.

Then came the heart rending details of touching scenes on the pier and the stories of the survivors who could give some coherent idea of just what happened after the Titanic struck the fatal iceberg. There were, of course, many wild rumors that were given as unconfirmed reports, some of them afterwards to be denied, others affirmed.

One of these reports was that Mrs. John Jacob Astor had died as the Carpathia was being docked. This was denied within five minutes. Another report, which is also denied, is that Major Archibald Butts, [sic] aide to President Taft, shot down eight men who were trying to seize a lifeboat. But the reports which dealt with the heroism of the men who forced the women into lifeboats and then remained to go down with the ship, have been confirmed to the last one.

President Taft’s statement that he never had any idea that Major Butts [sic] would allow himself to be saved when others had to go down, was one of the bulletins that excited great interest.

There were a great many telephone calls from all over the city and county seeking information. This was given as rapidly as possible, and the Home News was able to give a considerable list of the saved.

The Wireless

The Home News wireless station first heard from the Carpathia directly at about 5 p. m. yesterday. Her signals were very feeble. It was not until 7 o’clock that she established communication with Sea Gate, the Marconi station. Then the Carpathia sent out a flood of private messages, reassuring anxious friends and relatives. Most of these were received in the Home News station, although wireless conditions were at their worst, owing to the presence of much static electricity in the air. Even the commercial stations were forced to repeat all messages three or more times.

The first message sent to Sea Gate by the Carpathia was a large order for clothes to Siegel, Cooper & Co., to be delivered immediately at Pier 54, North River, as many of the passengers were scantil [sic] clothed.

The Marconi station begged again and again for a concise account of the accident, for which a sum of money in “four figures” was offered, but Captain Rostrom [sic] and J. Bruce Ismay positively refused to reply.

The Carpathia’s wireless equipment seemed to be very inefficient even at short range. There were long periods when her signals were indistinguishable to the operator at Sea Gate. Finally at about 9 p. m. she announced her arrival at dock, and her operator, who was the one saved from the Titanic, received congratulations on his escape.

Then at 9:15 p. m. was received the following dispatch from the New York Herald, which was bulletined at once:

“Steamship Carpathia arrived at 9 o’clock with 705 survivors of the Titanic. Col. John Jacob Astor, Major Butt, William Stead, Charles M. Hays, Isador [sic] Strauss [sic] and many other notable men not on board.

“Senate orders searching inquiry to place blame. J. Bruce Ismay, managing director of the White Star Line, to be summoned to Washington and questioned. British Parliament stirred and will also order an inquiry.

“N. Y. HERALD.”

Related Biographies:

Madeleine Talmage Astor
Archibald Willingham Butt

Relates to Ship:

Carpathia

Contributor

Mark Baber