Memorial Notice (4)

New York Times

HAYS---At a special meeting of the Board of Directors of the United States Mortgage and Trust Company held April 25, 1912, it was resolved that the following minutes be adopted and transmitted to the family of Mr. Charles M. Hays:

CHARLES MELVILLE HAYS
Born May 16, 1856
Lost at Sea April 15, 1912

The grief and sorrow which prevail throughout the civilized world as a sequence to the appalling disaster which befell the steamship Titantic are particularly profound and keenly emphasized in the minds and hearts of the Directors of the United Staten Mortgage and Trust Company, for among those lost was Charles Melville Hays, a member of this board since Aug. 31, 1905. His interest in its welfare was always zealous. His advice was uniformly helpful, and especially so because founded on and buttressed by his great wisdom and wide experience. It was a privilege to know him, and his unvarying courtesy and geniality made every moment of contact with his personality a rare pleasure. Some of this board have known him since the days of his youth, and all of them have come in touch with him during the course of the development of the striking genius and ability which stamped him as one of the really great men of the age.

Those whose good fortune it was to come into intimate touch with his ever pleasing presence, and with the impressive ability which, by successive onward steps, finally placed him at the head of one of the great railway systems of the world, mourn his death with a distinct sense of a personal bereavement.

The chronicles of the day record the important position he has held, the great successes he has achieved, the many confidences reposed in him, and the conspicuous part he has played in the development of the exacting and always interesting field of railway transportation and the extension of railway systems.

The loss to his family is an inexpressible sorrow and source of mourning; his loss to us is of the poignancy which comes from the passing of a beloved friend and co-worker; his loss to the world is reflected in the universal feelling that an aching void has come into the ranks of those whose services in the past and whose plans for the future have established the list of the leading and useful men of this day and generation.

Deeply mindful of the inadequacy of words to express the real depth of personal feelings and to portray the full extent of his loss, we hereby resolve to place an record this memorial to our dead associate, and our appreciation of his splendid character, of his rare and most distinguished abilities, and of his eminent and enduring achievements.

JOHN W. PLATTEN, President
ALEXANDER PHILLIPS, Secretary.

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Charles Melville Hays

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