Mrs. May Futrelle's account

Atlanta Constitution

There was no panic, no confusion among the passengers.

As soon as the slight shock came we went on deck in warm clothes and lifebelts, and were ordered down to A deck, below the boat deck, to wait our turn to get off...I went up on deck as the line proceeded and saw No. 4 launched with Mrs. Astor, Mrs. Widener, Mrs. Thayer, Mrs. Ryerson, her daughters and young son and others whom I knew... I ran back to see my husband... I left him. That is why I came away and left him there.

It came my turn to get into a boat, it was the last, or next to the last lifeboat launched. Mr. Ismay was not in it, nor anywhere around. In it were four first cabin women passengers, eight others, either second cabin or steerage, making twelve women in all, while there were eighteen men, one a first cabin passenger, who must have sneaked in, for there were no men allowed there, and seventeen of the crew, none of them oarsmen or sailors, but stewards and cooks...

After I left the ship two collapsible lifeboats were launched. In the last one was Mrs. Henry B. Harris, wife of the theatrical manager; Mrs. Thorn and Mrs. Hoyt, that I remember....the ship at that time had sunk to within 15 feet of the first deck...A minute afterward Mr. Hoyt leaped into the water, and was found by the boat after eight minutes, almost frozen to death....the Carpathia picked us up about 6:30 o'clock...

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Lily May Futrelle

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