Ohio Woman Lost Bridegroom

Lima News

Titanic Survivor Still Listed as Dead

WARREN, O., May 23 (AP) --- Mrs Emil Nummi, who has lived here quietly for quarter of a century, still is listed among the 1,517 who were drowned 41 years ago when the English liner Titanic sank.

She says she "just didn't get around" to correcting the list compiled after the world's biggest peacetime maritime disaster, from which there were only 712 survivors.

The liner --- on its maiden voyage --- struck an iceberg off Newfoundland.  Among the victims was Peter Hakkarainen, then Mrs. Nummi's new husband.  They had been on their honeymoon trip, headed for a job at Monnessen, Pa.

Hakkarainen, a native of Finland as was his bride, told her "I'll go see what's going on" after they felt the vessel's violent shudder the night of the wreck.  That was the last Mrs. Nummi saw of him.  She remarried years later at Weirton, W. Va.

SHE TELLS how she and 15 other women and a lone sailor left the sinking vessel in a partially filled lifeboat.  She was clad only in a thin nightgown.

Mrs. Nummi said the ship rammed the iceberg headon [sic], a question still debated by nautical experts.  Some think it sideswiped.

"The Titanic was painted plain white and was easily seen from my lifeboat, as it rose by the stern and slipped with a roar into the sea a little more than an half hour after colliding with the iceberg," Mrs. Nummi says, adding:

"I could see those still on board lined up against the ship's rails on the decks.  There wa no panic at that time, and it is true, they were all singing, 'Nearer My God to Thee' as they stood there watching the lifeboats move away from the doomed ship and waited for death to overtake them.

"I can never forget those horrible screams as the ship started to go under."

AMONG the other things she remembers are the "sailor in our boat --- clad only in a T-shirt and shorts --- saying he couldn't stand the cold much longer (and) the mother who left her seven children asleep in their cabin . . . "

She recalls the ship's lights went out shortly after the crash and that she stumbled up to the deck after being warned by a steward.

"I do not know if there was much panic on board before I got on deck," she continues, "although I remember much confusion when I was put into the lifeboat and almost lost my balance and fell out."

A ship, later identified as the California [sic], passed without stopping as the Titanic sank in those days of primitive radio communications.  
"We could see its lights and we cried for help but it passed by us and we turned our boat around and tried to follow it."

The Carpathia rescued her the next day and took her to the United States."

She worked as a dressmaker at Monessen before going to Wierton, where she met her present husband, who worked there in a tin mill.

Her only souvenirs are a small wedding picture and a blanket from the Carpathia.
 

Related Biographies:

Elin Matilda Hakkarainen

Acknowledgements

Courtesy of Terry Cooper

Contributor

Terry Cooper

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