SURVIVOR TELLS OF THE HEROISM OF CLARENCE MOORE

Washington Times

Robert W. Daniels Says Banker Went to His Death Like a Man
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Stories of the heroism and resignation with which Clarence Moore, the well-known local banker and horseman of international repute, went to his death on the deck of the Titanic as she sank to her grave two miles beneath the Atlantic, are being told by several survivors of the disaster today who arrived in Washington to attend the Senatorial hearing.

Clarence Moore died beyond a doubt at the side of his friend and fellow-hero, Major Archibald Butt. They remained together while lowering woman and children into the lifeboats, and jumped at the eleventh hour when the boilers of the giant ship bursted.

Repeatedly, Moore refused to take a place in one of the boats, the survivors who saw him say. His friend, Butt, knew that he was an oarsman, in fact, he realized that Clarence Moore could do most anything any true sportsman could, so he requested Moore to man an oar in one of the last lifeboats to leave the ship.

“No, major, I’ll stay and take my chances with you; let the women go,” Moore said to his companion according to Robert William Daniels, one of the survivors, who is stopping at the New Willard. “And he evidently stuck with Butt until death took them both,” said Mr. Daniels. “The two men jumped at the eleventh hour and were lost.”

J. Bruce Ismay, Col. Archibald Gracie and Miss Vera Dick, of Calgary, Canada, all of whom knew the banker, corroborate Daniels’ story regarding the last moments of Moore, and say that, with Major Butt, he went to his death in the waters like a true man.

Related Biographies:

Archibald Willingham Butt
Robert Williams Daniel
Vera Dick
Archibald Gracie
Joseph Bruce Ismay
Clarence Moore

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Mark Baber

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